Chelation therapy with drug disodium EDTA reduces risk of heart attack

Published on March 27, 2013 at 8:32 AM · No Comments

Although chelation therapy with the drug disodium EDTA has been used for many years with limited evidence of efficacy for the treatment of coronary disease, a randomized trial that included patients with a prior heart attack found that use of a chelation regimen modestly reduced the risk of a composite of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but the findings do not support the routine use of chelation therapy for treatment of patients who have had a heart attack, according to a study in the March 27 issue of JAMA.

Chelation therapy is an intravenous administration of chelating agents (such as disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid [EDTA]) to treat heavy metal toxicity. Based on favorable anecdotal and case report experience, chelation therapy has evolved in recent decades to include treatment for coronary and peripheral artery disease. "Three small clinical trials have assessed the effects of chelation on surrogate outcomes, such as walking distance in patients with claudication and time to exercise-induced ischemia in patients with coronary disease. These studies did not find any evidence of treatment efficacy but were underpowered for evaluation of clinical events," according to background information in the article.

"As a consequence, mainstream medical organizations consider the therapeutic value of chelation for atherosclerotic vascular disease unproven and the use of this therapy potentially dangerous. Disodium EDTA, particularly when infused too rapidly, may cause hypocalcemia [abnormally low level of calcium in the blood] and death," the authors write. Chelation therapy with disodium EDTA has been used for more than 50 years to treat atherosclerosis.

Gervasio A. Lamas, M.D., of the Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Fla., and colleagues conducted the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) to determine if an EDTA-based chelation regimen reduces cardiovascular events. The randomized trial enrolled 1,708 patients 50 years of age or older who had experienced a myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack) at least 6 weeks prior. Participants were recruited at 134 U.S. and Canadian sites. Enrollment began in September 2003 and follow-up took place until October 2011. Two hundred eighty-nine patients (17 percent of total;>

Patients were randomized to receive 40 infusions of a 500-mL chelation solution (3 g of disodium EDTA, 7 g of ascorbate, B vitamins, electrolytes, procaine, and heparin)>

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