Breast Cancer Symposium highlights risk and use of radiotherapy, MRI in DCIS patients

Published on September 7, 2013 at 5:19 AM · No Comments

New studies exploring breast cancer risk perceptions and use of radiotherapy and MRI for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, a preinvasive form of breast cancer) were highlighted today in a virtual presscast in advance of the 2013 Breast Cancer Symposium. The Symposium will take place September 7-9, 2013, at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis in San Francisco.

Three major studies were highlighted in today's presscast:

Radiation therapy for DCIS is safe, and does not appear to increase the risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease: A population-based study conducted in the Netherlands found that cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality rates among DCIS survivors ten years after completion of radiation therapy were similar to those of the general population of Dutch women.

MRI around the time of surgery may be unnecessary for women with DCIS: A large, retrospective study of women who underwent a lumpectomy for DCIS found that adding an MRI scan to standard mammography immediately before or after surgery does not decrease locoregional recurrence rates.

A large survey suggests majority of women may have an inaccurate perception about their personal breast cancer risk: An analysis of survey data collected from nearly 10,000 Long Island, New York, women who were scheduled to undergo mammography screenings determined that roughly one in ten women had an accurate perception of her lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Additionally, less than half of women said they had ever discussed breast cancer risk with their doctor.

"Oncologists are continuously reviewing their processes to ensure patients receive the best quality of care. Two studies presented today inform how we manage the growing number of patients with DCIS," said Steven O'Day, MD, American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Communications Committee member. "And another very important study points to the need for better communication between women and their doctors to ensure women receive appropriate breast cancer screening and, conversely, prevent unnecessary anxiety."

This year's Breast Cancer Symposium will bring together oncology professionals representative of the full spectrum of patient care to discover and discuss the latest research from more than 170 abstracts. Interactive discussions and presentations will focus on strengthening collaborative treatment approaches and enhancing patient care for the 234,580 newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer expected to occur in 2013*.

Six leading medical specialty societies co-sponsor the three-day, multidisciplinary symposium, including the American Society of Breast Disease, the American Society of Breast Surgeons, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the National Consortium of Breast Centers and the Society of Surgical Oncology.

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