People with severe mental illness may have higher risk for substance use

Published on January 5, 2014 at 11:55 PM · No Comments

In addition, certain protective factors often associated with belonging to certain racial or ethnic groups - or being female - did not exist in participants with severe mental illness. "In the general population, women have lower substance use rates than men, and Asian-Americans have lower substance use rates than white Americans, but we do not see these differences among people with severe mental illness," said Dr. Sarah Hartz, from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and first author on the study. "We also saw that among young people with severe mental illness, the smoking rates were as high as smoking rates in middle-aged adults, despite success in lowering smoking rates for young people in the general population."

Previous research has shown that people with schizophrenia have a shorter life expectancy than the general population, and chronic cigarette smoking has been suggested as a major contributing factor to higher morbidity and mortality from malignancy as well as cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. These new findings indicate that the rates of substance use in people with severe psychosis may be underestimated, highlighting the need to improve the understanding of the association between substance use and psychotic disorders so that both conditions can be treated effectively.

Source: NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

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