Scientists discover novel mechanism that influences GAS virulence at early steps of necrotizing fasciitis

Published on January 21, 2014 at 12:25 AM · No Comments

How does Streptococcus pyogenes, or Group A streptococcus (GAS) — a bacterial pathogen that can colonize humans without causing symptoms or can lead to mild infections — also cause life-threatening diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis (commonly known as flesh-eating disease) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome?

This mystery has intrigued many researchers in the field. Now, researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Medicine have discovered how this bacterium turns deadly. This opens the door to possible future treatments to curb this and other potentially fatal bacteria.  

Annually, GAS infections lead to at 500,000 deaths worldwide and cause severe consequences to those infected. The flesh-eating disease, in particular, is an extremely vicious infection which progresses rapidly throughout the soft tissues of the body, often leaving doctors with little time to stop or delay its progress. The main treatments include administration of antibiotics and surgical removal of infected tissues. Yet despite prompt treatment, the bacteria disseminate and cause death in approximately 25% of patients.

In probing how GAS progresses, Prof. Emanuel Hanski of the Institute of Medical Research Israel Canada at the Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine, together with Ph.D. student Moshe Baruch and an international research team, discovered a novel mechanism that influences GAS virulence at the early steps of the infection. The results of their study are published in the scientific journal Cell.

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