E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

Published on January 7, 2016 at 3:58 AM · 1 Comment

A new study, published in the Journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, found that e-cigarettes share a similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette® products and are comparable in reducing tobacco withdrawal symptoms.

The study, conducted by Fontem Ventures scientists, used a prototype vaping product with two percent nicotine concentration - the maximum limit prescribed by the EU Tobacco Products Directive - and found it delivered sufficient nicotine to suppress smoking desire.

"Unlike other nicotine replacement therapies, the vaping product we studied may offer a viable alternative to cigarettes for those finding it difficult to quit the behavioural and sensorial aspects of smoking," said Tanvir Walele, Senior Scientist at Fontem Ventures." The e-cigarette was well tolerated in smokers, had a similar short-term safety profile to Nicorette®, and clearly has the potential for use as an aid for smoking reduction or cessation."

Many smokers fail to quit because current nicotine replacement therapies do not deliver nicotine in the same way as conventional cigarettes, nor do they provide the unique sensory cues or rituals associated with the use of conventional cigarettes. A growing number of smokers are therefore choosing vaping products to quit or reduce their cigarette consumption, and to relieve tobacco withdrawal symptoms.

"By clinically evaluating the acute effects of vaping on nicotine blood levels and its short-term potential for reducing smoking desire and withdrawal symptoms, this research shows that e-cigarettes offer a smokers a legitimate aid to reduce or cease tobacco consumption, providing the products comply with safety, quality and efficacy standards set by a medicinal regulator," said Tanvir Walele.


Fontem Ventures

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  1. Cheryl Thomas Cheryl Thomas Canada says:

    Last paragraph: All this article does is blatantly confirm that Big Pharma wants to get it's sticky, greedy hands on one of the best inventions of the 21st century.

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