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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Psoriasis management: an interview with Dr Sandy McBride

Psoriasis management: an interview with Dr Sandy McBride

A major challenge around treating psoriasis is communication - psoriasis can flare and resolve in between appointments so it can be difficult to express and describe the life impact of these flares and recall possible triggers and response to treatments. People with psoriasis can also find it very difficult to talk about their emotions – something known as alexithymia – again making it difficult for clinicians to fully appreciate the impact of psoriasis. [More]
Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

A researcher at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has magnified a benefit of exercise in mice to provide a "profound" protection from diabetic cardiomyopathy, a potentially deadly heart condition that affects many people with diabetes. The discovery demonstrates the power of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions and suggests that one day some benefits of exercise may come in a pill or bottle. [More]
Filipino women who move to Canada face breast cancer risk at younger age

Filipino women who move to Canada face breast cancer risk at younger age

Filipinos who move to Canada are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than women from other parts of East Asia or Caucasians, new research has found. [More]
Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls who live in rural areas are more likely than their male counterparts to have undiagnosed asthma, and they often are at a higher risk of depression, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. [More]
Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness - and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes - said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Body hang-ups prevent UK women to have health checkup, finds new HeartAge research

Body hang-ups prevent UK women to have health checkup, finds new HeartAge research

New research revealed today by HeartAge has found that almost four million British women are putting their own health at risk, as they are too embarrassed to have a health check. [More]
Neurodegenerative disease research using NMR: an interview with Christian Griesinger

Neurodegenerative disease research using NMR: an interview with Christian Griesinger

Christian Griesinger, director of the NMR-based Structural Biology department at the Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, talks about his research into neurodegenerative diseases using NMR to examine the dynamics of disordered proteins. [More]
EKF introduces new diabetic biomarker test – The Stanbio Chemistry GSP LiquiColor® Assay

EKF introduces new diabetic biomarker test – The Stanbio Chemistry GSP LiquiColor® Assay

Glycated Serum Protein bridges the gap in diabetes testing in cases where HbA1c cannot be reliably measured [More]
DPP-4 inhibitors effective against low blood sugar levels

DPP-4 inhibitors effective against low blood sugar levels

DPP-4 inhibitors are a group of drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes that lower high blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin production in the body. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered that DPP-4 inhibitors are also effective against low blood sugar levels. [More]
Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment

Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment are at higher risk of developing dementia if they have diabetes or psychiatric symptoms such as depression, finds a new review led by UCL researchers. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Johns Hopkins researcher helps discover effectiveness of three drugs for treating patients with DME

Johns Hopkins researcher helps discover effectiveness of three drugs for treating patients with DME

A researcher from Johns Hopkins Medicine helped lead colleagues from across the country in a government-sponsored study by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network to discover that three drugs -- Eylea, Avastin and Lucentis -- used to treat diabetic macular edema are all effective. They also discovered that Eylea outperformed the other two drugs when vision loss was moderate to severe. [More]
Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists from Cardiff and Swansea Universities are combining the principles of the butterfly effect and computer simulation to explore new ways of predicting and controlling the beginnings of heart disease. [More]
Tandem Diabetes Care announces release of t:simulator App

Tandem Diabetes Care announces release of t:simulator App

Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc., a medical device company and manufacturer of the t:slim and t:flex Insulin Pumps, today announced the release of the t:simulator App, which mimics the touchscreen interface and features of the t:slim Insulin Pump. [More]
Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

In a first-of-its-kind analysis of worldwide dietary patterns, a team including researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge found overall diet quality worsened across the world even as consumption of healthier foods increased in many countries. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood, accompanied by temporary pre-diabetic conditions in healthy young men, according to new research published online February 19, 2015, in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. [More]
Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found a possible clue to why older mothers face a higher risk for having babies born with conditions such as Down syndrome that are characterized by abnormal chromosome numbers. [More]