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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
New Tel Aviv University study reveals impact of skipping breakfast on the health of diabetics

New Tel Aviv University study reveals impact of skipping breakfast on the health of diabetics

More and more Americans on-the-go are skipping the "most important meal of the day," not eating until lunch. This tendency to miss breakfast has already been linked to the growing epidemic of obesity and cardiovascular problems in the US -- and it may put the health of diabetics at risk as well. [More]
IU awarded $4.5 million NIH grant to create new federally designated diabetes research center

IU awarded $4.5 million NIH grant to create new federally designated diabetes research center

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Indiana University School of Medicine a five-year, $4.5 million grant to create a new federally designated Indiana Diabetes Research Center, one of just 16 such centers in the country. [More]
New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

Currently, one of the most effective surgical methods for treating obesity is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, which limits the amount of food and drink that can be ingested at one time and the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed through the intestinal tract. An unintended side effect of RYGB is that it reduces the patient's taste for sweet and fatty foods—but there is no scientific explanation for why these taste changes occur. [More]
Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through both lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery can significantly reduce features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver, according to two new studies published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training in the gym leads to a fall in liver fat levels. This is the finding of a new study held at the University of Haifa in cooperation with Tel Aviv Medical Center and Tel Aviv University. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
Scientists reveal potential therapeutic approach to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Scientists reveal potential therapeutic approach to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a very aggressive form of pulmonary fibrosis and has a particularly poor prognosis. This fatal disease, for which so far no causal therapies exist, is characterized by a massive deposition of connective and scar tissue in the lung, which leads to a progressive loss of lung function and ultimately death. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded grant to explore therapeutic potential of protein receptors in Parkinson's disease, other disorders

TSRI scientists awarded grant to explore therapeutic potential of protein receptors in Parkinson's disease, other disorders

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $1.5 million from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to explore the therapeutic potential of a class of proteins that play essential roles in the regulation and maintenance of human health. [More]
Regeneron, Sanofi to jointly advance new immuno-oncology treatment options for cancer patients

Regeneron, Sanofi to jointly advance new immuno-oncology treatment options for cancer patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi have entered into a new global collaboration to discover, develop and commercialize new antibody cancer treatments in the emerging field of immuno-oncology. [More]
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
Inflammation plays role in onset of delirium in older adults

Inflammation plays role in onset of delirium in older adults

Delirium is an acute state of confusion that often affects older adults following surgery or serious illness. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center confirms that inflammation - an immune response that develops when the body attempts to protect itself from harmful stimuli -- plays a role in the onset of delirium. [More]
Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a molecule that acts as an exercise mimic, which could potentially help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

A 20-year study by James Cook University scientists has found a strong link between diabetes and tuberculosis in tropical Australia. [More]
Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty young and promising researchers from Nijmegen - eleven from Radboud University and nine from Radboudumc - are each to receive up to 250,000. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Veni grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol

FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Praluent (alirocumab) Injection, the first FDA-approved treatment in a new class of drugs known as PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) inhibitors. [More]
EMA's CHMP recommends approval of Praluent (alirocumab) for use in patients with hypercholesterolemia

EMA's CHMP recommends approval of Praluent (alirocumab) for use in patients with hypercholesterolemia

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the European Medicine Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use has adopted a positive opinion for the marketing authorization of Praluent (alirocumab), recommending its approval for use in certain adult patients with hypercholesterolemia. [More]
3SBio purchases entire equity interest in Zhejiang Wansheng

3SBio purchases entire equity interest in Zhejiang Wansheng

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced that it has acquired the entire equity interest in Zhejiang Wansheng Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd a limited liability company incorporated in the PRC for an aggregate consideration of RMB 528 million. [More]
Study examines possible new approaches to improve health and quality of life for people with MS

Study examines possible new approaches to improve health and quality of life for people with MS

The physical symptoms of weakness and fatigue from multiple sclerosis (MS) can rock a person's confidence and ability to engage in what he or she feels is important, from being a good parent and friend to taking up a hobby, according to Matthew Plow, assistant professor from Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
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