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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.
De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

In reading, a bookmark tells where you stopped. Cells use bookmarks too, specific proteins that help the cell remember what collection of genes needs to be turned on again after the brief halt of gene expression during cell division. [More]
Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Children and teenagers who are obese have different microorganisms living in the digestive tract than their lean counterparts, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

The Center for Global Health in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to honor Ernest Madu, MD, chairman and CEO of the Heart Institute of the Caribbean with its first annual Global Health Champion Award. [More]
Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

The type of fat you eat matters, but a new study suggests that the benefits of good fats vanish when stress enters the picture. [More]
Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
Sanford wins $11.7 million NIH grant to translate laboratory cancer research into clinical trials

Sanford wins $11.7 million NIH grant to translate laboratory cancer research into clinical trials

The Cancer Biology Research Center at Sanford Research is the recipient of a five-year, nearly $11.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to translate laboratory research into clinical trials for head and neck and pediatric cancers. [More]
Improving muscle health could enhance response to insulin in Type 1 diabetes patients

Improving muscle health could enhance response to insulin in Type 1 diabetes patients

Loss of physical strength due to muscle deterioration is a complication for people living with Type 1 diabetes that's often overlooked. New research from McMaster University shows it shouldn't be. [More]
Free, student-run CPPT clinic at Rutgers helps improve physical function among patients

Free, student-run CPPT clinic at Rutgers helps improve physical function among patients

Ulises Mantilla was a 21-year-old college student when he suffered a stroke at his home in Newark in 2012. The last thing he remembers about that day is dialing 911. He awoke from a coma a month later in the hospital, unable to walk or perform simple tasks. [More]
Epilepsy patients more likely to experience increased risk of discrimination than general population

Epilepsy patients more likely to experience increased risk of discrimination than general population

In a recent analysis, people with epilepsy were seven-fold more likely to have reported experiencing discrimination due to health problems than the general population. This risk was greater than other chronic health problems such as diabetes, asthma and migraines. [More]
Desalination can increase prevalence of inadequate iodine intake

Desalination can increase prevalence of inadequate iodine intake

Hebrew University study suggests that desalination can dramatically increase the prevalence of inadequate iodine intake. [More]
UAB experts seek to improve patient adherence recommendations for DR screenings

UAB experts seek to improve patient adherence recommendations for DR screenings

The prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the United States is 9.3 percent and expected to increase, along with complications associated with diabetes that include diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults ages 20 to 74 in the United States. [More]
Researchers find switch that helps restore damaged axons

Researchers find switch that helps restore damaged axons

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found a switch that redirects helper cells in the peripheral nervous system into "repair" mode, a form that restores damaged axons. [More]
Fat stem cells can lower risk of diabetes in healthy obese individuals

Fat stem cells can lower risk of diabetes in healthy obese individuals

Obesity is responsible for the deaths of over three million people a year worldwide due to its associated diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Over a quarter of US adults aged 50 years or more are inactive

Over a quarter of US adults aged 50 years or more are inactive

Research conducted at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that 1 in 4 US adults aged 50 years or over do not take regular exercise. [More]
Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear have discovered a new mutation in a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli that resists clearance by the body's own immune system by inhibiting white blood cells that ordinarily kill and remove bacteria. [More]
New model shows how globalization may create workplace stress leading to cardiovascular disease

New model shows how globalization may create workplace stress leading to cardiovascular disease

University of California, Irvine and SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers have created a model illustrating how economic globalization may create stressful employment factors in high-income countries contributing to the worldwide epidemic of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into a physical activity program that is focused on strength, balance and flexibility could improve older adults' mental health, aerobic endurance and confidence in their ability to exercise, according to a study led by Georgia State University. [More]
HMS scientists reveal how certain tumors develop taste for fat

HMS scientists reveal how certain tumors develop taste for fat

Cancers are such notorious sugar addicts that PET scans searching for the disease light up when they detect sugar-gobbling tumor cells. [More]
Certain fatty acids may increase diabetes risk in women, study finds

Certain fatty acids may increase diabetes risk in women, study finds

Women who consume high amounts of certain fatty acids are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, irrespective of body mass index (BMI), according to a new study. [More]
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