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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

Scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), using state-of-the-art genetic technology, have discovered the likely cause of a child's rare type of severe muscle weakness. [More]
Making small changes to protein- and carbohydrate-rich foods is associated with weight loss

Making small changes to protein- and carbohydrate-rich foods is associated with weight loss

Making small, consistent changes to the types of protein- and carbohydrate-rich foods we eat may have a big impact on long-term weight gain, according to a new study led by researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy at Tufts University. [More]
Better insulin injection technique can improve blood glucose control in diabetes patients, says study

Better insulin injection technique can improve blood glucose control in diabetes patients, says study

A recent study by Grassi et al. has concluded that blood glucose control in diabetes patients who inject insulin can be improved through better injection technique, which includes switching patients to 4 mm pen needles. [More]
Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]
New, cross-sector collaboration aims to discover clinical biomarker for pancreatic cancer

New, cross-sector collaboration aims to discover clinical biomarker for pancreatic cancer

The search to discover and validate the first-ever clinical biomarker to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer is at the foundation of a new, cross-sector collaboration. Berg, a biopharmaceutical company committed to uncovering health solutions through a data-driven, biological research approach; the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital, and the Pancreatic Cancer Research Team managed by Cancer Research And Biostatistics announced today they will work together to eradicate the disease. [More]
Study: Viagra, other related drugs not a universal 'cure-all' for impotence

Study: Viagra, other related drugs not a universal 'cure-all' for impotence

Viagra and other related drugs are not a universal 'cure-all' for impotence, according to a new study from The University of Manchester and NatCen Social Research. [More]
TABS study: Older people can improve their health by reducing sitting time

TABS study: Older people can improve their health by reducing sitting time

"I feel lethargic when I sit all day," said Gerald Alexander, an 82-year-old retired social service worker among the 25 Group Health patients who participated in the Take Active Breaks from Sitting (TABS) pilot study. "I feel much peppier when I stand and take walks." [More]
AstraZeneca selects Regulus' RG-125 as clinical candidate for treatment of NASH

AstraZeneca selects Regulus' RG-125 as clinical candidate for treatment of NASH

Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, announced today the selection of RG-125 (AZD4076), a GalNAc-conjugated anti-miR targeting microRNA-103/107 (“miR-103/107”) for the treatment of Non Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (“NASH) in patients with type 2 diabetes/pre-diabetes, as a clinical candidate by AstraZeneca under the companies’ strategic alliance to discover, develop and commercialize microRNA therapeutics. [More]
Countdown begins for 10th BIOVISION forum

Countdown begins for 10th BIOVISION forum

The countdown begins with only one week to go until the life science event of the year. The BIOVISION forum is now in it’s 10th year, hosting over 1,500 attendees from the international health care and life sciences sector. [More]
Study: Standard nursing assessments may help improve outcomes in cirrhosis patients

Study: Standard nursing assessments may help improve outcomes in cirrhosis patients

Patients hospitalized with advanced cirrhosis, a chronic and degenerative disease of the liver, are at increased risk of death. The tools currently used to assess that risk are limited in predicting which patients will need a liver transplant and which will be healthy enough to survive transplantation. [More]
Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

The shorter you are- the more your risk of coronary heart disease. That's the key finding of a new study led by the University of Leicester which discovered that every 2.5 inches change in your height affected your risk of coronary heart disease by 13.5%. For example, compared to a 5ft 6inch tall person, a 5 foot tall person on average has a 32% higher risk of coronary heart disease because of their relatively shorter stature. [More]
Rhythm, Actavis announce initiation of relamorelin Phase 2b trial for treatment of diabetic gastroparesis

Rhythm, Actavis announce initiation of relamorelin Phase 2b trial for treatment of diabetic gastroparesis

Rhythm, a biopharmaceutical company, and Actavis plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, announced today the initiation of a Phase 2b clinical trial assessing the efficacy and safety of relamorelin (RM-131), Rhythm's ghrelin agonist, for the treatment of gastroparesis in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the western world. A new study published in the Journal of Hepatology shows that exercise, regardless of frequency or intensity, benefits obese and overweight adults with NAFLD. [More]
UT researchers receive 2.5 million euros from European Commission for TransGeno project

UT researchers receive 2.5 million euros from European Commission for TransGeno project

The European Commission supports the TransGeno project of UT researchers with 2.5 million euros. This support helps to recruit top researchers to work at the ERA Chair of Translational Genomics of the University of Tartu soon to be created. The research work done at the new chair will advance research in translational genomics, so that in the future, doctors would be able to diagnose diseases as early as possible, thus improving opportunities for treatment. [More]
CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

A cellular defect that can impair the body's ability to handle high glucose levels and could point the way to a potential new treatment for diabetes has been identified by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

Just as some people seem built to run marathons and have an easier time going for miles without tiring, others are born with a knack for memorizing things, from times tables to trivia facts. These two skills—running and memorizing—are not so different as it turns out. [More]
Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

A commonly-used drug to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease, has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in obese mice, potentially identifying the gut immune system as a new and effective target in treating diabetes in humans. [More]

Livongo Health secures $20 million in Series B funding

Livongo Health, a consumer digital health company that is empowering people with chronic diseases to live better, announced today that it has secured $20 million in Series B funding from investors including Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), DFJ and previous investor General Catalyst. [More]
CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

The CVS Health Foundation, a private foundation created by CVS Health Corporation (NYSE: CVS), today announced 55 new grant recipients as part of its multi-year, $5 million commitment to increase access to health care in communities nationwide. [More]
Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Today in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's (CHOP) PolicyLab published the largest study to date documenting the significant risks to children's health associated with prescription antipsychotics, a powerful a class of medications used to treat mental and behavioral health disorders. [More]
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