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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.
CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

One of the main functions of the kidneys is to filter metabolic products out of the blood. If the kidneys are no longer able to do this, the blood has to be artificially purified and drained of excess fluid. [More]
Diabetes, kidney disease may play role in increasing adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans

Diabetes, kidney disease may play role in increasing adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans

New research indicates that diabetes and kidney disease may increase African Americans' risk of stroke and coronary heart disease, as well as their risk of dying from cardiovascular causes. [More]
Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Patients with a low Athens QRS score are highly likely to have coronary artery disease even if they have a normal exercise stress test, say researchers. [More]
Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. [More]
Simple method may help predict type 2 diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes

Simple method may help predict type 2 diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes

An international team of researchers has discovered a simple, accurate new way to predict which women with gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes after delivery. [More]
New optical detection technology could be effective to monitor blood-glucose levels

New optical detection technology could be effective to monitor blood-glucose levels

A newly developed method for detecting glucose based on how it absorbs a specific type of light could spell the end of the painful, invasive finger-prick tests diabetics rely on to monitor their condition, says a Texas A&M University biomedical engineer who is developing the technology. [More]
Latest comprehensive survey reveals top health concerns for South Siders

Latest comprehensive survey reveals top health concerns for South Siders

Residents on the South Side say cancer, violence prevention and sexually transmitted infections are among their top health concerns, according to the latest comprehensive assessment conducted by the University of Chicago Medicine. [More]
Study to examine new ways to transfer autistic child's improving communication skills into education setting

Study to examine new ways to transfer autistic child's improving communication skills into education setting

A University of Manchester-led study is testing whether an intervention with parents and teachers can help children with autism transfer newly acquired social communication skills from home into school. [More]
Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

As age increases, older adults can develop problems taking their medications. But until now, few studies have examined the traits that might cause elders to need help with their medications, or how widespread a problem this might be. [More]
Researchers identify candidate genes controlling phenolic compound accumulation in broccoli

Researchers identify candidate genes controlling phenolic compound accumulation in broccoli

Love it or hate it, broccoli is touted as a superfood, offering an array of health benefits. And it's about to get even more super. [More]
Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that consuming 1-2 servings of walnuts per week (1/4 cup per serving) was associated with reduced risk of developing impairments in physical function, which helps enable older women to maintain independence throughout the aging process. [More]
Researchers uncover new clues about role of glucosamine in early embryonic development

Researchers uncover new clues about role of glucosamine in early embryonic development

Most pregnant women with well-controlled diabetes give birth to healthy children. But their babies run much higher risks of birth defects than babies born to women without diabetes, because very early in embryonic development, the babies are exposed to higher levels of glucose in maternal blood. [More]
Researchers find link between clu and genes that cause Parkinson's disease

Researchers find link between clu and genes that cause Parkinson's disease

The fruit fly may help us be less clueless about human muscle development and Parkinson's disease. [More]
Mitofusin 2 protein could serve as therapeutic target to ameliorate sarcopenia in older adults

Mitofusin 2 protein could serve as therapeutic target to ameliorate sarcopenia in older adults

One of the alterations that most affects the quality of life of the elderly is muscle wastage and the resulting loss of strength, a condition known as sarcopenia. At about 55 years old, people begin to lose muscle mass, this loss continues into old age, at which point it becomes critical. [More]
Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

The DIABIMMUNE project followed the development of 39 Finnish infants from birth to the age of three. Half of the children received 9-15 antibiotic treatments during the research period, and the other half did not receive any such treatments. [More]
Researchers find improvements in many aspects of U.S. diet

Researchers find improvements in many aspects of U.S. diet

In nationally representative surveys conducted between 1999 and 2012, several improvements in self-reported dietary habits were identified, such as increased consumption of whole grains, with additional findings suggesting persistent or worsening disparities based on race/ethnicity and education and income level, according to a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%

Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%

Having diabetes increases the risk of dying from the effects of a heart attack by around 50 per cent, according to a widespread study. [More]
ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

The American College of Physicians today provided physician perspective on the escalating cost of prescription drugs, the impact of the costs on internal medicine physicians and their patients, and support for the intent of the bipartisan Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016 to reduce anti-competitive practices. [More]
Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

A simple model consisting of four risk factors can help surgeons to predict the risk of complications after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)—a common condition causing compression of the spinal cord in the neck, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
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