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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.
Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas. [More]
Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Karolinska Institutet have found that gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression (PPD) in first-time mothers. [More]
Researcher to explore experiences of teenage girls living with endometriosis

Researcher to explore experiences of teenage girls living with endometriosis

A researcher from Birmingham City University is set to embark on a study into the awareness and experiences of endometriosis in adolescent girls [More]
TGen scientists identify potent inhibitory compound for treatment against glioblastoma

TGen scientists identify potent inhibitory compound for treatment against glioblastoma

A study led by scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute has identified "a potent inhibitory compound" in the elusive hunt for an improved treatment against glioblastoma, the most common and deadly type of adult brain cancer. [More]
Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Obesity has been linked to "letter" changes at many different sites in the genome, yet these differences do not fully explain the variation in people's body mass index (BMI) or why some overweight people develop health complications while others don't. [More]
New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

Over 93 percent of heart attack patients are receiving stents within the guideline-recommended threshold of 90 minutes after arriving at the hospital, with the median time to stenting only 59 minutes, according to a broad report on trends in heart disease care from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
More people with mental illness, substance use disorders have insurance coverage, research suggests

More people with mental illness, substance use disorders have insurance coverage, research suggests

Significantly more people with mental illness and substance use disorders had insurance coverage in 2014 due to the expansion of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, but many barriers to treatment remain, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Standard chemotherapy is a blunt force instrument against cancer - and it's a rare cancer patient who escapes debilitating side effects from systemic treatments that mostly affect dividing cells, both malignant and healthy, throughout the body. [More]
New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

As commuters shimmy past large, lumbering trucks on the road, they may glance over and wonder, "How safe is that driver next to me?" If the truck driver is in poor health, the answer could be: Not very. [More]
Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

A synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Every meal triggers short-term inflammatory responses in healthy individuals

Every meal triggers short-term inflammatory responses in healthy individuals

When we eat, we do not just take in nutrients - we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. [More]
Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Policies to control tobacco use, including tobacco tax and price increases, can generate significant government revenues for health and development work, according to a new landmark global report from the World Health Organization and the National Cancer Institute of the United States of America. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

A new paper published in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests that a woman's blood pressure before pregnancy is related to her likelihood of giving birth to a boy or girl. [More]
Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

In vitro fertilization has transformed reproductive medicine and sparked a number of therapeutic and diagnostic breakthroughs. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

The University of Maryland Medical Center is now offering a simple genetic test to patients who receive heart stents to determine whether they have a genetic deficiency that affects how they respond to a common drug to prevent blood clots. [More]
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