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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Study of genetic risk factors of IBD in African-Americans published in Gastroenterology journal

Study of genetic risk factors of IBD in African-Americans published in Gastroenterology journal

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, along with colleagues at Emory University and Cedars-Sinai, have published in the journal Gastroenterology the first major, in-depth analysis of genetic risk factors of inflammatory bowel disease in African-Americans. [More]
UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is extremely deadly and often has a poor prognosis. Ranked as the fourth deadliest cancer in the U.S. and poised to move up within the next few years, pancreatic cancer is very difficult to detect in its early stages. Seldom diagnosed early and typically spreading rapidly, the disease has no effective treatment once it advances. [More]
New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome is the most common disorder of the male sex chromosomes, yet is rarely diagnosed in children. A new assessment tool is being developed by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to help pediatricians detect the physical traits of the syndrome. The tool could pave the way for early interventions that prevent and treat a range of physical, psychological, social, and cognitive impairments. [More]
BD Life Sciences completes acquisition of Cellular Research

BD Life Sciences completes acquisition of Cellular Research

BD Life Sciences, a segment of leading global medical technology company BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), today announced it has completed the acquisition of Cellular Research, Inc. [More]
Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System receives FDA approval

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System receives FDA approval

Dexcom, Inc., a leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for patients with diabetes, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System. [More]
High dietary iron intake suppresses hormone that regulates appetite

High dietary iron intake suppresses hormone that regulates appetite

Here's one more reason to cut down on the amount of red meat you eat. Using an animal model, researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found that dietary iron intake, equivalent to heavy red meat consumption, suppresses leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

In response to the growing opioid crisis, several states, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, have granted pharmacists the authority to provide naloxone rescue kits without a prescription to at-risk patients. This model of pharmacy-based naloxone (PBN) education and distribution is one of the public health strategies currently being evaluated at hundreds of pharmacies in both states to determine the impact on opioid overdose death rates. [More]
Ascendis Pharma's total revenue decreases 50% to €1.9 million in second quarter 2015

Ascendis Pharma's total revenue decreases 50% to €1.9 million in second quarter 2015

Ascendis Pharma A/S, a clinical stage biotechnology company that applies its innovative TransCon technology to address significant unmet medical needs, today announced financial results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015. [More]
Researchers examine relationship between energy needs and 'pleasure' of eating in food intake

Researchers examine relationship between energy needs and 'pleasure' of eating in food intake

A team at the Laboratoire biologie fonctionnelle et adaptative (CNRS/Université Paris Diderot) investigated the relative role of energy needs and "pleasure" of eating in food intake. The researchers studied a group of neurons in mice. They observed that when the neuron activity is compromised, feeding behavior becomes less related to the body's metabolic needs and more dependent on food palatability. [More]
High blood sugar may reduce positive effects of exercise on bone health in diabetic patients

High blood sugar may reduce positive effects of exercise on bone health in diabetic patients

Diabetes, which now affects almost 30 million Americans, can cause serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower-extremity amputations. [More]
Variation in genetic mechanism increases fat storage and drives obesity

Variation in genetic mechanism increases fat storage and drives obesity

A specific gene region has long been suspected of contributing to obesity in humans but the precise mechanisms behind this were previously unclear. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Harvard Medical School and other partners have been able to show that a single genetic alteration in this region reduces thermogenesis (fat burning), instead increasing lipid storage. [More]
Mexican engineer designs new ring that can help diagnose sexually transmitted diseases

Mexican engineer designs new ring that can help diagnose sexually transmitted diseases

A ring with the ability to diagnose sexually transmitted diseases like syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis was designed by the Mexican Ernesto Rodríguez Leal. [More]
Primary care physicians' starring role key to weight loss, find Johns Hopkins researchers

Primary care physicians' starring role key to weight loss, find Johns Hopkins researchers

A review of survey data from more than 300 obese people who participated in a federally funded weight loss clinical trial found that although the overall weight loss rates were modest, those who rated their primary care doctor's support as particularly helpful lost about twice as many pounds as those who didn't. [More]
Alpha lipoic acid can stimulate telomerase with positive effects in mouse model of atherosclerosis

Alpha lipoic acid can stimulate telomerase with positive effects in mouse model of atherosclerosis

In human cells, shortened telomeres, the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes, are both a sign of aging and contribute to it. Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have found that the dietary supplement alpha lipoic acid (ALA) can stimulate telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, with positive effects in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. [More]
Study demonstrates that high sugar intake linked to poor family functioning

Study demonstrates that high sugar intake linked to poor family functioning

The quality of general family functioning is a major determinant of healthy dietary habits - according to new research published in the Journal of Caries Research and led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike. [More]
New set of genes can indicate improved survival after surgery for pancreatic cancer patients

New set of genes can indicate improved survival after surgery for pancreatic cancer patients

A study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and other major research institutes, found a new set of genes that can indicate improved survival after surgery for patients with pancreatic cancer. The study also showed that detection of circulating tumor DNA in the blood could provide an early indication of tumor recurrence. [More]
Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Virginia Tech researchers have identified a biomarker in pre-diabetic individuals that could help prevent them from developing Type II diabetes. [More]
New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

A new study has found a "significant association" between adults who have suffered a traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives and who also have attention deficit hyperactive disorder. [More]
EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company today announced positive top-line results from EMPA-REG OUTCOME. This is a long-term clinical trial investigating cardiovascular (CV) outcomes for Jardiance (empagliflozin) in more than 7,000 adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at high risk for CV events. [More]
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