Vaccine News and Research RSS Feed - Vaccine News and Research

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Vaccine boosts advanced NSCLC patient survival

Vaccine boosts advanced NSCLC patient survival

Investigation of a vaccine targeting a glycoside present in non-small-cell lung cancer has demonstrated efficacy as a switch therapy for patients with stable, advanced disease after chemotherapy. [More]
Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for not vaccinating

Not all students returning to school this month will be up to date on their vaccinations. A new study conducted by Jennifer Reich, a researcher at the University of Colorado Denver, shows that the reasons why children may not be fully vaccinated depends on the class privilege of their mothers. [More]
Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could have large effects on coverage in Africa

Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could have large effects on coverage in Africa

Expanding the age of eligibility for measles vaccination from 12 to 15 months could have potentially large effects on coverage in Africa, according to a new report published by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. [More]
State highlights: Minn. vaccine requirements; Sovaldi in Calif. prisons; Ga. Rural ERs

State highlights: Minn. vaccine requirements; Sovaldi in Calif. prisons; Ga. Rural ERs

For the first time in a decade, Minnesota schoolchildren are required to receive additional vaccines this fall. Seventh-graders now must get the meningococcal vaccination and an additional pertussis (whooping cough) booster. [More]
Recommendation by physician could halve racial disparity in who gets flu shot

Recommendation by physician could halve racial disparity in who gets flu shot

Doctors should make a point of offering a flu vaccine to their patients. A simple reminder could considerably reduce the number of racial and ethnic minorities who currently do not vaccinate themselves against this common contagious respiratory illness. [More]
OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. [More]
Five tips to make children go back to school

Five tips to make children go back to school

It's that time of year again: parents are winding down summer plans and tightening the reins on bedtime schedules. And while adding anything else to the back-to-school to-do list may seem daunting, Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has five tips that will make going back to school this year easier than ever. [More]
Research finds stronger weapon against leprosy and tuberculosis

Research finds stronger weapon against leprosy and tuberculosis

In many parts of the world, leprosy and tuberculosis live side-by-side. Worldwide there are approximately 233,000 new cases of leprosy per year, with nearly all of them occurring where tuberculosis is endemic. [More]
Researchers use optical tweezers to measure how strongly parasites adhere to red blood cells

Researchers use optical tweezers to measure how strongly parasites adhere to red blood cells

Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by a parasite that invades one red blood cell after another. Little is known about this infection process because it happens so quickly, potentially explaining why there is currently no approved malaria vaccine. [More]
Some mothers-to-be opt out of getting flu vaccine despite recommendations from physicians

Some mothers-to-be opt out of getting flu vaccine despite recommendations from physicians

Both mother and fetus are at increased risk for complications of flu infection during pregnancy. And prenatal care providers say they're advising women to get the flu vaccine, in line with recommendations from various organizations. But many pregnant women don't understand the importance of this advice-and don't get the vaccine. [More]
Complete analysis of bioseparation technologies for global biopharmaceutical markets

Complete analysis of bioseparation technologies for global biopharmaceutical markets

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: ​Bioseparation Systems for Global Biopharmaceutical Markets [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]
Santa Monica pediatricians use key safety measures to ensure worry-free vaccinations

Santa Monica pediatricians use key safety measures to ensure worry-free vaccinations

Before sending your kids off to school, it's more important than ever to keep them safe from potential illnesses through vaccination from an expertly trained medical professional. [More]
Assumptions on teen sexual activity result in low rates of HPV vaccination

Assumptions on teen sexual activity result in low rates of HPV vaccination

Probing deeper into the complex decisions that parents and providers face regarding the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine, researchers found that though both parties appreciated importance of the HPV vaccine, their personal assumptions surrounding timing of administration relative to onset of sexual activity resulted in decreased vaccination rates. [More]
ITS develops new T cell vaccine to protect humans from seasonal and pandemic influenza A

ITS develops new T cell vaccine to protect humans from seasonal and pandemic influenza A

Immune Targeting Systems, specializing in the development of novel T cell immune therapies, has been developing an exciting new T cell vaccine (FlunisynTM) designed to protect humans from all strains of seasonal and pandemic influenza A. [More]
61% of U.S. adults unaware of the importance of high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for older adults

61% of U.S. adults unaware of the importance of high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for older adults

A new survey from CVS/pharmacy released today found that three in five U.S. adults (61 percent) are unaware of the importance of the high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for adults 65 years and older. [More]
WHO taps UTMB to lead emerging infectious disease vaccine efforts

WHO taps UTMB to lead emerging infectious disease vaccine efforts

The world experts on vaccine development at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have received an international designation acknowledging their unique niche in a sphere where research, government regulation and big pharma often collide. [More]
Medical advisory panel recommends new pneumonia vaccine for seniors

Medical advisory panel recommends new pneumonia vaccine for seniors

The experts expressed concern, however, that Medicare rules may hamper some people from getting the new vaccine if they have already had an older version. Also in drug issues, some patient advocates report that insurers are balking at paying for a costly drug to treat hepatitis C if the patients are in drug treatment programs. [More]
Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. [More]
Microbiologist receives contract from U.S. DOD to develop vaccine against tularemia

Microbiologist receives contract from U.S. DOD to develop vaccine against tularemia

Microbiologist Karl Klose, a professor in the UTSA College of Sciences' Department of Biology and a member of the South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, has received a contract from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to conduct research that would bring scholars one step closer to developing a vaccine against tularemia. [More]