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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

A University of Georgia researcher is lead author on an international paper on folate biomarkers as part of an initiative to provide evidence-based guidance for the global nutrition and public health community. [More]
Study provides insight into potential new therapies for mitochondrial and metabolic diseases

Study provides insight into potential new therapies for mitochondrial and metabolic diseases

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
Dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes spreading to new areas, warn scientists

Dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes spreading to new areas, warn scientists

Scientists behind the first global distribution maps of two species of dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes warn they are spreading to new areas where they could cause disease. [More]
BiondVax’s universal influenza vaccine meets safety and immunogenicity endpoints

BiondVax’s universal influenza vaccine meets safety and immunogenicity endpoints

BiondVax Pharmaceuticals Ltd. today announced positive preliminary results from its BVX-006 Phase II clinical trial of M-001, BiondVax's candidate for a universal influenza vaccine. [More]
Wistar Institute study shows that PI3K inhibitors may make a patient's cancer even worse

Wistar Institute study shows that PI3K inhibitors may make a patient's cancer even worse

The enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) appears to be exploited in almost every type of human cancer, making it the focus of considerable interest as a therapeutic target, with many PI3K-inhibiting drugs currently in various stages of clinical development. However, PI3K inhibitors have only shown modest clinical activity with patients who receive these drugs experiencing very little improvement in survival. [More]
Government of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea to sponsor development of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine for malaria

Government of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea to sponsor development of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine for malaria

The Government of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea announced an agreement with industry partners, Marathon Oil Corporation, Noble Energy Inc. and AMPCO, to sponsor the clinical development of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine against malaria, including a series of clinical trials from 2015 until 2018. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

As the South Korean epidemic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) continues unabated, researchers have raced to find treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 400 people since it was first discovered three years ago in Saudi Arabia. [More]
University of Oklahoma professor finds key mosquito protein for development of new malaria vaccine

University of Oklahoma professor finds key mosquito protein for development of new malaria vaccine

A University of Oklahoma professor studying malaria mosquito interaction has discovered a new mosquito protein for the development of a new vaccine that is expected to stop the spread of the disease in areas where it is considered endemic. [More]
Clinical data demonstrates safe administration of Pexa-Vec in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Clinical data demonstrates safe administration of Pexa-Vec in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

SillaJen, Inc., a private clinical-stage biotherapeutics company focused on the development of oncolytic immunotherapy products for cancer, today announced a publication of data demonstrating that in a Phase Ib trial of Pexa-Vec, patients received multiple bi-weekly doses of its lead product Pexa-Vec, representing the first report of multiple intravenous administrations of an oncolytic vaccinia. [More]
Global GBM therapeutics market to expand at CAGR of 10.9% to $623 million by 2020

Global GBM therapeutics market to expand at CAGR of 10.9% to $623 million by 2020

According to analysis from business intelligence provider GBI Research - Glioblastoma Multiforme Therapeutics in Major Developed Markets to 2020 - the value of the global Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) treatment market will expand at a rapid Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 10.9%, from $301 million in 2013 to $623 million by 2020. [More]
Artemisinin and the fight against malaria: an interview with Dr. Robert Sebbag, Sanofi

Artemisinin and the fight against malaria: an interview with Dr. Robert Sebbag, Sanofi

Since 2014, more than 16 million anti-malarial treatments derived from the Sanofi patented process for semi-synthetic artemisinin have been supplied to endemic countries in Africa. [More]
Study suggests link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of HPV vaccine series among Appalachian women

Study suggests link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of HPV vaccine series among Appalachian women

Could a fatalistic attitude toward cervical cancer serve as a barrier to prevention of the disease? A recent study conducted by University of Kentucky researchers in the Rural Cancer Prevention Center suggests a link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series among a sample of young Appalachian Kentucky women. [More]
UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

The flu virus can be lethal. But what is often just as dangerous is the body's own reaction to the invader. This immune response consists of an inflammatory attack, meant to kill the virus. But if it gets too aggressive, this counterattack can end up harming the body's own tissues, causing damage that can lead to death. [More]
Wistar Institute researchers identify specific mutations responsible for ineffectiveness of flu vaccines

Wistar Institute researchers identify specific mutations responsible for ineffectiveness of flu vaccines

Viruses like influenza have the ability to mutate over time, and given that the flu vaccines administered during the 2014-2015 season were largely ineffective at preventing the spread of the flu, it appears the virus that recently circulated had taken on mutations not accounted for when last year's vaccine was developed. [More]
Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

As a tumor grows, its cancerous cells ramp up an energy-harvesting process to support its hasty development. This process, called autophagy, is normally used by a cell to recycle damaged organelles and proteins, but is also co-opted by cancer cells to meet their increased energy and metabolic demands. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
Pan Am Cancer Treatment Center announces publication of immuno-oncology text book

Pan Am Cancer Treatment Center announces publication of immuno-oncology text book

The Pan Am Cancer Treatment Center is pleased to announce the publication of a specialized textbook titled "Immuno-Oncology, from Bench to Bedside" which provides scientific rationale for the use of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer. [More]
Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Chlamydiae are the most common, sexually transmitted, bacterial pathogens in the world. Every year around 100 million people contract Chlamydia infections, which are one of the main causes of female infertility and ectopic pregnancies and can also lead to blindness - especially in developing countries. [More]
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