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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Research shows effectiveness of Tamiflu

Research shows effectiveness of Tamiflu

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of antiviral drugs to help treat influenza, in a year when the available vaccine is not a good match for the current strain. [More]
UAB doctor says measles can be halted with safe, effective measles vaccine

UAB doctor says measles can be halted with safe, effective measles vaccine

An ongoing, multistate measles outbreak linked to a California amusement park has already caused 68 confirmed cases between Jan. 1 and 23, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Immunomic Therapeutics, Astellas Pharma sign license deal to develop LAMP-vax DNA vaccines

Immunomic Therapeutics, Astellas Pharma sign license deal to develop LAMP-vax DNA vaccines

Immunomic Therapeutics, Inc. ("Immunomic Therapeutics"), a company developing next-generation vaccines based on the LAMP-vax platform, and Astellas Pharma Inc. ("Astellas") today announced they have entered into an exclusive license agreement for Japan to develop and commercialize JRC2-LAMP-vax, Immunomic Therapeutics' vaccine designed to treat allergies induced by Japanese red cedar pollen. [More]
Researchers create customized soap bubbles that promote drug and vaccine delivery

Researchers create customized soap bubbles that promote drug and vaccine delivery

When University of Maryland Professors Philip DeShong and Daniel Stein began tagging soap bubbles with biomolecules, they had no idea this technology would one day be poised to change the way drugs and vaccines fight against bacteria, viruses and cancer. [More]
SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance was recently recognized for outperforming its anticipated one-year survival rate for allogeneic transplant patients. [More]
Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Influenza is associated with as many as 7,300 deaths annually in nursing home residents, but the vaccination rate for nursing home staff is only 54 percent, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Case Western researchers awarded NSF grant to develop new method to reduce risk of Ebola virus

Case Western researchers awarded NSF grant to develop new method to reduce risk of Ebola virus

Health care workers must diagnose and isolate Ebola victims at an early stage to have a chance to save them and prevent the virus from spreading. But the most sensitive and quickest diagnostic test produces a small percentage of false negative results that undermine efforts to control the deadly agent. [More]
Efficacy of ebola vaccine to be assessed in large-scale clinical trial

Efficacy of ebola vaccine to be assessed in large-scale clinical trial

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) announced today that they will soon be commencing the first large-scale clinical trial to assess the efficacy of an experimental ebola vaccine. [More]
NCCS launches human clinical trial of new cancer vaccine

NCCS launches human clinical trial of new cancer vaccine

The National Cancer Centre Singapore has launched a clinical trial of a new cancer vaccine administered to human patients for the first time in the world. Cancer immunotherapy (the harnessing of the body's defence system to fight the patient's cancer, has emerged as one of the most exciting medical breakthroughs in the past two years. [More]
UTMB study reveals that only about half of teenage girls get HPV vaccine at the recommended age

UTMB study reveals that only about half of teenage girls get HPV vaccine at the recommended age

It's a virus that is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer but a new study by University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers indicates that only about half of the girls receive the vaccine at the recommended age to best protect themselves. [More]
New experimental study shows immunotherapy can reduce acute effects of heroin

New experimental study shows immunotherapy can reduce acute effects of heroin

Immunotherapy could have a place in the treatment of substance abuse in the future. A specific antibody can reduce the acute effects of heroin, according to a new experimental study at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Study on influenza B viruses could help make flu vaccination programs more effective

Study on influenza B viruses could help make flu vaccination programs more effective

An analysis of 10 years' worth of data on human influenza B viruses has shed new light on the pathogen which can cause the seasonal flu. Findings from this study could help make flu immunization programs more effective; by better targeting vaccines or by eventually eliminating one of the flu lineages completely. [More]
Effective vaccine booster schedules needed to fight against whooping cough resurgence

Effective vaccine booster schedules needed to fight against whooping cough resurgence

A key to victory in battle, according to Chinese general and military strategist Sun Tzu, is to know your enemy. In the current fight against whooping cough resurgence, perhaps the biggest obstacle is an incomplete understanding of its underlying causes, according to a University of Michigan population ecologist. [More]
Combining insecticide-treated bed nets and vaccines may worsen malaria

Combining insecticide-treated bed nets and vaccines may worsen malaria

Combining insecticide-treated bed nets with vaccines and other control measures may provide the best chance at eliminating malaria, which killed nearly 600,000 people worldwide in 2013, most of them African children. [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
BMG Pharma S.R.L Grants The Exclusive Distribution Rights For Gelx® Oral Gel And Gelx® Spray For The Treatment Of Oral Mucositis In Cancer Patients To FERRER INTERNACIONAL S.A.

BMG Pharma S.R.L Grants The Exclusive Distribution Rights For Gelx® Oral Gel And Gelx® Spray For The Treatment Of Oral Mucositis In Cancer Patients To FERRER INTERNACIONAL S.A.

BMG Pharma S.r.l. today is pleased to announce that it has signed an exclusive distribution agreement with FERRER INTERNACIONAL S.A., granting them the rights to promote, sell and market its own product GelX for the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Russia and North Africa. [More]
Researchers identify clusters of underimmunization, vaccine refusal in Northern California

Researchers identify clusters of underimmunization, vaccine refusal in Northern California

Researchers used spatial analysis software and electronic medical records to identify clusters of underimmunization and vaccine refusal among Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California, according to a study published today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Early estimates indicate flu vaccine is providing little protection in US

Early estimates indicate flu vaccine is providing little protection in US

Each year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) undertake flu vaccine effectiveness studies. Early estimates for the current season indicate that those people (all ages) who had the flu vaccine were only 23% less likely to have to go to the doctor because of flu (influenza). [More]
NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded contracts to three organizations to support early-stage human clinical trials of investigational infectious disease treatments. The new awards for the Phase I Clinical Trial Units for Therapeutics increases the number of funded organizations under the program from two to three, expanding capacity for conducting early safety testing of novel investigational drugs. [More]
Universal vaccine against flu may be on the horizon, say researchers

Universal vaccine against flu may be on the horizon, say researchers

The fact that this year's flu shot is not a good match against this year's influenza strain is well known, and has happened before. [More]