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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the European Commission has granted an orphan drug designation (ODD) to Soliris (eculizumab), a first-in-class terminal complement inhibitor, for the prevention of graft rejection following solid organ transplantation. Graft rejection can cause severe injury to the transplanted organ and is a significant barrier to successful transplantation. [More]

Vaccine against H. pylori infection is within reach

Researchers from the University of Rhode Island are championing a recent breakthrough in the laboratory with hopes it could lead to a vaccine against the pathogen responsible for stomach cancer and to therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. [More]
Pediatric viral respiratory tract infection often complicated by bacterial sinusitis

Pediatric viral respiratory tract infection often complicated by bacterial sinusitis

Nearly 1 in 10 cases of viral upper respiratory tract infections in infants and young children is complicated by acute bacterial sinusitis, often in conjunction with acute otitis media, a longitudinal cohort study has found. [More]

Automated diagnostic technologies redefine infectious diseases

The diagnostics market for infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus and human papilloma virus is expanding, giving rise to commercial opportunities especially in the developing economies of Asia, Africa and Latin America. [More]
Doctors must consider factors when administering combination vaccines, say researchers

Doctors must consider factors when administering combination vaccines, say researchers

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. [More]

FDA grants Orphan Drug Designation to Emergent BioSolutions' BioThrax for PEP of anthrax disease

Emergent BioSolutions Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation to BioThrax (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) of anthrax disease resulting from suspected or confirmed exposure to Bacillus anthracis. [More]
Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

GlaxoSmithKline plc and Genmab A/S announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a Supplemental Biologic License Application (sBLA) for the use of Arzerra® (ofatumumab), a CD20-directed cytolytic monoclonal antibody, in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) for whom fludarabine-based therapy is considered inappropriate. [More]
EcoHealth Alliance examines the origins of Ebola virus outbreaks

EcoHealth Alliance examines the origins of Ebola virus outbreaks

EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit organization that focuses on conservation and global public health issues, published a comprehensive review today examining the current state of knowledge of the deadly Ebola and Marburg virus. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
Scientists create new model of memory that provides complete picture of how memory works

Scientists create new model of memory that provides complete picture of how memory works

Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. [More]
Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. [More]

Scientists develop novel antiviral drug that may prevent spreading of measles

A novel antiviral drug may protect people infected with the measles from getting sick and prevent them from spreading the virus to others, an international team of researchers says. [More]
UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

The global experts who study the deadliest infectious diseases recognized the contributions of Frederick A. Murphy and Thomas G. Ksiazek, professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch, with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 6th annual International Symposium on Filoviruses. The filoviruses include Ebola and Marburg viruses that cause death in 50 to 90 percent of people infected. The current outbreak of Ebola virus raging in West Africa has caused more than 100 deaths so far. [More]

Study: Bacterium that causes whooping cough changes in Australia

The bacterium that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has changed in Australia - most likely in response to the vaccine used to prevent the disease - with a possible reduced effectiveness of the vaccine as a result, a new study shows. [More]
Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

The University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research (CVR) and Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, have entered a scientific collaboration to help assess the effectiveness of a dengue vaccine once introduced for immunization programs. [More]

Irvine Scientific announces launch of BalanCD MDCK cell culture medium

Irvine Scientific is pleased to announce the launch of its BalanCD MDCK cell culture medium, a next generation cell culture product responding to today's requirements for media used in cell-based vaccine manufacturing. This new flagship product expands Irvine Scientific's current BalanCD product portfolio of animal component-free and chemically-defined media with the addition of a new purpose-built product. [More]
Viewpoints: Sebelius withstood attacks, but wasn't 'warrior' for law; Burwell offers GOP chance to focus on law's problems

Viewpoints: Sebelius withstood attacks, but wasn't 'warrior' for law; Burwell offers GOP chance to focus on law's problems

Kathleen Sebelius was known for her patience and cool under savage attack by Republicans, who treated her as a stand-in for the health law. She sat through hearings calmly reciting talking points while they fumed and fulminated for their audience. But that turned out to be one of her biggest liabilities ... What the health law needed in its first years was a cheerful, populist warrior who could laugh at the truly ridiculous distortions and lies Republicans invented about it, and roar back with the truth. Instead, she came across as a mild technocrat. She never emerged from the defensive crouch she assumed after the law's calamitous debut (David Firestone, 4/11). [More]

Study: Immunization program in UK has reduced HPV infections in young women

Each year around 2,000-2,500 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in England, the most common cancer in women under 35. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) types 16 and 18 is responsible for around 70-80% of cervical cancers. [More]
Irrational health beliefs associated with lower adherence to prescribed cardiac rehab program, says study

Irrational health beliefs associated with lower adherence to prescribed cardiac rehab program, says study

​Heart patients with beliefs about health that aren't based on medical evidence are more likely to skip sessions of cardiac rehabilitation, new research suggests. [More]
EU-funded project aims to find solution to combat hepatitis C epidemic in Egypt

EU-funded project aims to find solution to combat hepatitis C epidemic in Egypt

New ways to differentiate between chronic and self-clearing infections may help towards effective patient management and reduce drug costs. But there are major challenges in implementation. [More]