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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

Scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch were recognized with prestigious awards for their contributions in research at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting. [More]
Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes chronic respiratory disease in birds. The illness particularly affects domestic chicken and turkey flocks. The bacteria are especially life-threatening for the animals when they occur in combination with other infections. In order to control the spread of the disease, poultry farms in the EU must be proven free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum or face being closed. [More]
Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

Three-day global symposium on Ebola virus, other infectious diseases

The 11th annual International Consortium on Anti-Virals (ICAV) symposium, Infectious Diseases: Global Public-Health Challenges of the Next Decade, will put the challenges posed by several infectious diseases under the microscope, including the Ebola virus, the H7N9 influenza virus, MERS coronavirus and dengue viruses, as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis. [More]
Most parents want all children in daycare centers to be vaccinated

Most parents want all children in daycare centers to be vaccinated

Most parents agree that all children in daycare centers should be vaccinated, and that daycare providers should be checking vaccine records every year, according to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Uber brings on-demand flu prevention to Chicago

Uber brings on-demand flu prevention to Chicago

In partnership with Vaccine Finder, Uber is bringing on-demand flu prevention to Chicago. UberHEALTH helps Chicagoans stay healthy this season with flu prevention packs on demand TODAY, Nov. 18 from 10 am until 4 pm CST for free. [More]
TapImmune signs new collaborative research agreement with VGTI Florida

TapImmune signs new collaborative research agreement with VGTI Florida

TapImmune, Inc., is pleased to announce a new collaborative research agreement with The Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute of Florida, a leading, non-profit biomedical research institute, forming a partnership to advance TapImmune's proprietary, cancer vaccines into Phase II human clinical trials for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers. [More]
New look at the workings of HIV, other viruses

New look at the workings of HIV, other viruses

UC Davis researchers are getting a new look at the workings of HIV and other viruses thanks to new techniques in electron microscopy developed on campus. [More]
Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Most research on spinal cord injuries has focused on effects due to spinal cord damage and scientists have neglected the effects on brain function. University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have found for the first time that spinal cord injuries (SCI) can cause widespread and sustained brain inflammation that leads to progressive loss of nerve cells, with associated cognitive problems and depression. [More]
Discovery opens up new routes to strengthen anti-smoking efforts to control TB

Discovery opens up new routes to strengthen anti-smoking efforts to control TB

TB is an infectious disease that kills 1.5 million people each year, and smoking is the biggest driver of the global TB epidemic. Medical scientists at Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital in Ireland have unlocked the mechanism underlying the connection between smoking and Tuberculosis (TB). [More]
Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Glioblastoma is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor, and despite advances in standard treatment, the median survival is about 15 months (compared to 4 months without treatment). [More]
Genticel completes patient enrollment for ProCervix phase II study

Genticel completes patient enrollment for ProCervix phase II study

Genticel, a French biotechnology company and leading developer of therapeutic vaccines, today announces the completion of patient enrollment of the phase II study of its lead therapeutic vaccine candidate, ProCervix. [More]
Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. [More]
Experimental Ebola treatments to be trialled in West Africa next month

Experimental Ebola treatments to be trialled in West Africa next month

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have announced that three trials of Ebola therapies will begin in West Africa this December. [More]
Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Scientists from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology have used the power of new genomic technology to discover that microbes that commonly infect the eye have special, previously unknown properties. These properties are predicted to allow the bacterium -- Streptococcus pneumoniae -- to specifically stick to the surface of the eye, grow, and cause damage and inflammation. [More]
Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Among approximately 26,000 women, receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery or small-for-gestational-age birth or with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, although a small increased risk of being diagnosed with chorioamnionitis (an inflammation of the membranes that surround the fetus) was observed, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study reveals ETEC bacteria's genetic composition

Study reveals ETEC bacteria's genetic composition

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are responsible each year for around 400 million cases of diarrhoea and 400,000 deaths in the world's low- and middle-income countries. Children under the age of five are most affected. [More]
Griffith University receives significant funding boost to combat pneumonia

Griffith University receives significant funding boost to combat pneumonia

Griffith University’s bid to fight the childhood killer pneumonia has received a significant boost following the award of a $304,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

A national survey from Rite Aid and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases reveals that the majority of adult women living in the United States do not believe they are up to date on vaccinations to protect against many preventable diseases. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]