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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

A common polymorphism - a variation in a person's DNA sequence that is found with regularity in the general population - can lead to a chain of events that dictates how a tumor will progress in certain types of cancer, including a form of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer, according to new research from The Wistar Institute that was published online by the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
LSDF announces $1.2 million in grants to foster advancement of promising health-related technologies

LSDF announces $1.2 million in grants to foster advancement of promising health-related technologies

The Life Sciences Discovery Fund today announced $1.2 million in Proof of Concept grants to Washington-based organizations to foster the advancement of promising health-related technologies to commercial products. Also announced were two commercialization-focused awards, totaling $600,000, through a new funding program requiring external cash matching. [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced it has initiated a phase I trial of its hTERT DNA immunotherapy (INO-1400) alone or in combination with Inovio's IL-12 immune activator (INO-9012) in adults with breast, lung, or pancreatic cancer at high risk of relapse after surgery and other cancer treatments. [More]
High-dose flu vaccine better than regular flu shot for frail, older adults of long-term care facilities

High-dose flu vaccine better than regular flu shot for frail, older adults of long-term care facilities

The high-dose flu vaccine is significantly better than the regular flu shot at boosting the immune response to the flu virus in frail, older residents of long-term care facilities, according to the results of a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine study. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
Scientists validate oral vaccine delivery system to combat global health threats

Scientists validate oral vaccine delivery system to combat global health threats

Scientists at The Forsyth Institute and Tufts University have succeeded in describing and validating a unique system of oral vaccine delivery using a common bacteria found in the mouth. [More]
Study provides evidence for presence of enterovirus in pancreatic islets of type 1 diabetic patients

Study provides evidence for presence of enterovirus in pancreatic islets of type 1 diabetic patients

Norwegian scientists with European partners have found evidence for the presence of Enterovirus in pancreatic islets of type 1 diabetic patients. This provides evidence consistent with the theory that a low grade Enteroviral infection in the pancreatic islets contribute to disease progression in humans. [More]
NTU scientists discover how malaria parasite develops resistance towards front-line drugs

NTU scientists discover how malaria parasite develops resistance towards front-line drugs

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University have discovered exactly how the malaria parasite is developing resistance towards the most important front-line drugs used to treat the disease. [More]
FDA approves Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent vaccine to prevent four strains of influenza virus

FDA approves Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent vaccine to prevent four strains of influenza virus

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the supplemental biologics license application (sBLA) for Fluzone Intradermal Quadrivalent vaccine. [More]
MD Anderson president applauds FDA's approval of new vaccine for HPV-related cancers

MD Anderson president applauds FDA's approval of new vaccine for HPV-related cancers

The Food and Drug Administration's approval of a new vaccine that targets five additional strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) fortifies a proven cancer-prevention weapon, according to Ronald A. DePinho, M.D., president of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

When we acquire diarrhea on a vacation, it is often caused by a bacterial infection. Now a Danish research team is working on a new type of vaccine design targeting the disease causing bacterium - if it works it may very well revolutionize not only the prevention of this disease, but also offer protection against other pathogens with a heavy disease burden such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). [More]
OncoTherapy Network discusses latest research on prostate cancer

OncoTherapy Network discusses latest research on prostate cancer

UBM Medica US announces that OncoTherapy Network, a leading online community to help oncologists and other clinicians gain a better understanding of the newest information available regarding the use of targeted therapies and immunotherapies, discusses some of the latest research on prostate cancer. [More]
Potential new active substances for treating dengue virus

Potential new active substances for treating dengue virus

Researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg are proposing potential new active substances for treating the dengue virus. Just like Ebola, dengue fever is also caused by a virus for which there is currently no cure and no vaccine and can be fatal. [More]
Simple tips to keep families safe from flu

Simple tips to keep families safe from flu

The flu, or seasonal influenza virus, is extremely unpredictable. Its severity can vary widely from one season to the next depending on many things, including the strains of flu spreading, availability of vaccines, how many people get vaccinated and how well the flu vaccine is matched to the flu viruses circulating each season. [More]
Immunizing school-aged children from flu can protect others as well

Immunizing school-aged children from flu can protect others as well

Mathematical models predicted it, and now a University of Florida study confirms it: Immunizing school-aged children from flu can protect other segments of the population, as well. [More]
Drug proves effective at inhibiting growth of drug-resistant bacteria

Drug proves effective at inhibiting growth of drug-resistant bacteria

A treatment pioneered at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research is far more effective than traditional antibiotics at inhibiting the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, including so-called "superbugs" resistant to almost all existing antibiotics, which plague hospitals and nursing homes. [More]

Researchers develop nanomimics of host cell membranes that trick malaria parasites

Malaria parasites invade human red blood cells, they then disrupt them and infect others. Researchers at the University of Basel and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute have now developed so-called nanomimics of host cell membranes that trick the parasites. This could lead to novel treatment and vaccination strategies in the fight against malaria and other infectious diseases. [More]
Study shows seasonal flu vaccines may protect individuals against many different viruses

Study shows seasonal flu vaccines may protect individuals against many different viruses

Seasonal flu vaccines may protect individuals not only against the strains of flu they contain but also against many additional types, according to a study published this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Study: Injectable 3D vaccines could help prevent cancer, infectious disease

Study: Injectable 3D vaccines could help prevent cancer, infectious disease

One of the reasons cancer is so deadly is that it can evade attack from the body's immune system, which allows tumors to flourish and spread. Scientists can try to induce the immune system, known as immunotherapy, to go into attack mode to fight cancer and to build long lasting immune resistance to cancer cells. [More]