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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Cloned Zika virus could be used for development of attenuated vaccine

Cloned Zika virus could be used for development of attenuated vaccine

Stopping the explosive spread of Zika virus - which can lead to birth defects in babies born to infected mothers - depends on genetic insights gleaned through new tools and models. [More]
Scientists discover novel African types of Salmonella linked to blood poisoning and death

Scientists discover novel African types of Salmonella linked to blood poisoning and death

The first global-scale genetic study of Salmonella Enteritidis bacteria, which is a major cause of blood poisoning and death in Africa and food poisoning in the Western World, has discovered that there are in fact three separate types. [More]
Many parents support HPV vaccine school-entry requirements with opt-out provisions

Many parents support HPV vaccine school-entry requirements with opt-out provisions

Requiring students to get vaccinated against the human papillomavirus, or HPV, to enter school could prevent many cancers linked to the virus, but University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that many parents only support such requirements with opt-out provisions that could make the laws less effective. [More]
Common cold virus actually transmitted from camels to humans

Common cold virus actually transmitted from camels to humans

There are four globally endemic human coronaviruses which, together with the better known rhinoviruses, are responsible for causing common colds. Usually, infections with these viruses are harmless to humans. [More]
UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women

UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women

UNC School of Medicine's Anne Lyerly is addressing the urgent need for effective HIV prevention and treatment for the estimated 1.5 million women worldwide with HIV who give birth each year. [More]
Large emergency vaccination campaigns to curb yellow fever outbreak in Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo

Large emergency vaccination campaigns to curb yellow fever outbreak in Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo

One of the largest emergency vaccination campaigns ever attempted in Africa will start in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo this week as WHO and partners work to curb a yellow fever outbreak that has killed more than 400 people and sickened thousands more. [More]
Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

A large, nationwide study published in the journal JAMA Oncology found that people who received transplants of cells collected from a donor's bone marrow the original source for blood stem cell transplants, developed decades ago had better self-reported psychological well-being, experienced fewer symptoms of a common post-transplant side effect called graft-vs.-host disease and were more likely to be back at work five years after transplantation than those whose transplanted cells were taken from the donor's bloodstream. [More]
NIH funds collaborative project to develop better vaccine adjuvants for many diseases

NIH funds collaborative project to develop better vaccine adjuvants for many diseases

Dr. Qizhi Cathy Yao, professor of surgery, molecular virology and microbiology, and pathology & immunology at Baylor College of Medicine, has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant to fund a collaborative project with Molecular Express, Inc. [More]
Nigerian Government reports 2 children paralyzed by wild poliovirus

Nigerian Government reports 2 children paralyzed by wild poliovirus

After more than two years without wild poliovirus in Nigeria, the Government reported today that 2 children have been paralyzed by the disease in the northern Borno state. [More]
RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

A method for "silencing" RNA that emerged from a University of Wisconsin-Madison spinoff company is in clinical trials in Europe, Asia and the United States against hepatitis B, an infection that can destroy the liver. [More]
Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. [More]
Industrial chemicals exceed safety levels in public drinking water supplies for 6 million Americans

Industrial chemicals exceed safety levels in public drinking water supplies for 6 million Americans

Levels of a widely used class of industrial chemicals linked with cancer and other health problems--polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs)--exceed federally recommended safety levels in public drinking water supplies for six million people in the U.S., according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. [More]
Wistar scientists discover novel mechanism that helps tumors adapt to hypoxia

Wistar scientists discover novel mechanism that helps tumors adapt to hypoxia

One of the many reasons tumors are so difficult to treat is that they are able to adapt whenever they are exposed to unfavorable conditions. [More]
Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

The images are heartbreaking: thousands of infants born with small, misshapen heads, the result of a rare neurological disorder, called microcephaly, which can cause a myriad of intellectual and developmental disabilities. The culprit? Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that has swept through many parts of South America and more recently surfaced in Florida. [More]
Mayo Clinic expert offers tips to avoid illness at major events

Mayo Clinic expert offers tips to avoid illness at major events

Zika isn't the only health concern now that the games have begun in Rio. Massive crowds from around the globe will be at the Olympics, and that means a world-class array of germs will mix with them. [More]
GSK launches educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis

GSK launches educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis

GSK today launched an educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis, a rare but potentially deadly disease. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Wistar scientists discover marker for PMN-MDSCs in the blood of cancer patients

Wistar scientists discover marker for PMN-MDSCs in the blood of cancer patients

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a population of immune cells that have been implicated in tumor resistance to various types of cancer treatment, including targeted therapies, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. [More]
Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

A month after announcing that two promising vaccine candidates provided mice with complete protection against the Zika virus, a research team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in collaboration with scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the University of São Paulo, now reports achieving complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys. [More]
Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

A joint University of Adelaide-Shanghai Jiao Tong University study has provided the first broad picture of the evolution and possible functions in the plant of pollen allergens. [More]
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