Vaccine News and Research RSS Feed - Vaccine News and Research

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
World Hepatitis Summit highlights need to develop national programmes that can eliminate viral hepatitis

World Hepatitis Summit highlights need to develop national programmes that can eliminate viral hepatitis

Participants at the first-ever World Hepatitis Summit will urge countries to develop national programmes that can ultimately eliminate viral hepatitis as a problem of public health concern. [More]
University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

In use for more than a century, inhaled anesthetics like nitrous oxide and halothane have made modern surgery possible. Now, in experiments in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have added to evidence that certain so-called "volatile" anesthetics -- commonly used during surgeries -- may also possess powerful effects on the immune system that can combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung, including influenza and pneumonia. [More]
Sleep loss increases chance of catching a cold

Sleep loss increases chance of catching a cold

A new study led by a UC San Francisco sleep researcher supports what parents have been saying for centuries: to avoid getting sick, be sure to get enough sleep. [More]
Multiple HIV-1 variants at the beginning of infection impact viral load setpoints

Multiple HIV-1 variants at the beginning of infection impact viral load setpoints

HIV-1 infection with multiple founder variants points to poorer clinical outcomes than infection with a single variant, according to a paper published today in the journal Nature Medicine. [More]
Soligenix completes enrolment in SGX942 Phase 2 trial for oral mucositis in cancer patients

Soligenix completes enrolment in SGX942 Phase 2 trial for oral mucositis in cancer patients

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today it has completed enrollment of the additional subjects, as directed by the Data Review Committee (DRC) earlier this year, into the company's Phase 2 study for SGX942. [More]
Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health, in partnership with vaccine manufacturer PaxVax, Inc. is participating in a clinical study to test the effects of the oral typhoid vaccination, Vivotif (Typhoid Vaccine Live Oral Ty21a). The study will look at the side effects that could occur when taking Vivotif across the range of approved potencies. [More]
Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels for kindergarteners are low for most states and infant vaccination rates are high nationally, according to data from two reports published in this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Every organism--from a seedling to a president--must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery. [More]
Soligenix obtains additional funding from NIAID to advance development of OrbeShield for GI ARS treatment

Soligenix obtains additional funding from NIAID to advance development of OrbeShield for GI ARS treatment

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has exercised its option to advance preclinical development of OrbeShield (oral beclomethasone 17,21-dipropionate or oral BDP). [More]
Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

An oral cholera vaccine that is in short supply could treat more people and save more lives in crisis situations, if one dose were dispensed instead of the recommended two, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

What do a prominent physiologist and two-time survivor of pancreatic cancer and a world-renowned researcher whose landmark discoveries on aspirin, drug therapies of proven benefit and therapeutic lifestyle changes that have saved more than 1.1 million lives have in common? They are both passionate about the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risks of dying from heart attacks and strokes, as well as developing diabetes, hypertension and colon cancer. And more importantly, enhancing mental health and fostering healthy muscles, bones and joints in all Americans from childhood to the elderly. [More]
Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
New research could potentially yield novel platform for cancer vaccines

New research could potentially yield novel platform for cancer vaccines

New research led by Wyss Core Faculty member David Mooney, Ph.D., in collaboration with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute could potentially yield a new platform for cancer vaccines. Leveraging a biologically inspired sponge-like gel called "cryogel" as an injectable biomaterial, the vaccine delivers patient-specific tumor cells together with immune-stimulating biomolecules to enhance the body's attack againstcancer. [More]
Study: Influenza vaccines offer sustained protection up to 6 months during flu season

Study: Influenza vaccines offer sustained protection up to 6 months during flu season

Individuals who received the flu vaccine were protected for up to 6 months post-vaccination, the duration of most flu seasons, according to a study presented at the 2015 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
New study affirms value of influenza vaccination among older people

New study affirms value of influenza vaccination among older people

A new study of the records of millions of nursing home residents affirms the value of influenza vaccination among the elderly. The Brown University analysis found that between 2000 and 2009, the better matched the vaccine was for the influenza strain going around, the fewer nursing home residents died or were hospitalized. [More]
TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Study sheds light on helper cells and killer cells

Study sheds light on helper cells and killer cells

Scientists at the University of Bonn, together with colleagues from the USA and Japan, have shed light on an important immune mechanism. Their work shows how the body provides the important killer cells with a helper in the case of an infection. The study could point the way to better vaccines in the future. [More]
Novel synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against MERS virus in animal study

Novel synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against MERS virus in animal study

A novel synthetic DNA vaccine can, for the first time, induce protective immunity against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus in animal species, reported researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid is expected to save billions of dollars a year as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire and use of generic versions of these drugs increases, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These savings may provide relief from the high costs of these medications and allow policymakers to lift restrictions on patients' access, the researchers argue. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement