Vaccine News and Research RSS Feed - Vaccine News and Research

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Study sheds light on helper cells and killer cells

Study sheds light on helper cells and killer cells

Scientists at the University of Bonn, together with colleagues from the USA and Japan, have shed light on an important immune mechanism. Their work shows how the body provides the important killer cells with a helper in the case of an infection. The study could point the way to better vaccines in the future. [More]
Novel synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against MERS virus in animal study

Novel synthetic DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against MERS virus in animal study

A novel synthetic DNA vaccine can, for the first time, induce protective immunity against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus in animal species, reported researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid is expected to save billions of dollars a year as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire and use of generic versions of these drugs increases, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These savings may provide relief from the high costs of these medications and allow policymakers to lift restrictions on patients' access, the researchers argue. [More]
WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

The World Health Organization and partners are racing to cope with the health needs of thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in northeastern South Sudan where fighting continues and the humanitarian situation remains dire. [More]
NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

New York Blood Center today announced a new collaboration with the University of California, Davis, Health System to manufacture specialized lines of stem cells as potential therapies for repair and regeneration of retina, kidney, lung and liver tissue, as well as for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. [More]
Experimental MERS-CoV vaccine shows promise in monkeys and camels

Experimental MERS-CoV vaccine shows promise in monkeys and camels

National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues report that an experimental vaccine given six weeks before exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) fully protects rhesus macaques from disease. The vaccine also generated potentially protective MERS-CoV antibodies in blood drawn from vaccinated camels. [More]
H1N1 vaccine developed at UNMC to be evaluated in animal study

H1N1 vaccine developed at UNMC to be evaluated in animal study

An H1N1 vaccine developed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center will enter a definitive round of testing this month, and researchers hope to establish its ability to ward off the virus. [More]
NIAID exercises option to advance development of Soligenix's heat stabilized ricin toxin vaccine

NIAID exercises option to advance development of Soligenix's heat stabilized ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has exercised its option to advance the development of Soligenix's heat stabilized ricin toxin vaccine, RiVax. [More]
Immunization programmes face a growing challenge from vaccine hesitancy

Immunization programmes face a growing challenge from vaccine hesitancy

People who delay or refuse vaccines for themselves or their children are presenting a growing challenge for countries seeking to close the immunization gap. Globally, one in 5 children still do not receive routine life-saving immunizations, and an estimated 1.5 million children still die each year of diseases that could be prevented by vaccines that already exist, according to the World Health Organization. [More]
Contact precaution use needs to be individualized to fit hospital's specific needs and resources

Contact precaution use needs to be individualized to fit hospital's specific needs and resources

Contact precautions are recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for all patients known to be infected with or carrying multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). Yet, the use of contact precautions--which require a patient to be isolated in a single hospital room and health care providers to wear a gown and gloves when caring for patients--is widely debated in the medical community. [More]
Experts review role of vaccine hesitancy in limiting vaccine coverage, explore strategies to handle it

Experts review role of vaccine hesitancy in limiting vaccine coverage, explore strategies to handle it

People who delay or refuse vaccines for themselves or their children are presenting a growing challenge for countries seeking to close the immunization gap. Globally, 1 in 5 children still do not receive routine life-saving immunizations, and an estimated 1.5 million children still die each year of diseases that could be prevented by vaccines that already exist, according to WHO. [More]
TapImmune announces successful conveyance of Investigational New Drug Application from Mayo Clinic

TapImmune announces successful conveyance of Investigational New Drug Application from Mayo Clinic

TapImmune, Inc., a clinical stage immunotherapy company, specializing in the development of innovative technologies for the treatment of metastatic cancer, announced today the successful conveyance of the Mayo Clinic IND (Investigational New Drug Application) to TapImmune as part of the recently completed licensing agreement. [More]
Researchers develop new genomic data set on Lassa virus

Researchers develop new genomic data set on Lassa virus

An international team of researchers has developed the largest genomic data set in the world on Lassa virus (LASV). [More]
PHIV children may lack immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella despite vaccination

PHIV children may lack immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella despite vaccination

Between one-third and one-half of individuals in the United States who were infected with HIV around the time of birth may not have sufficient immunity to ward off measles, mumps, and rubella--even though they may have been vaccinated against these diseases. [More]
USciences professor provides infection control measures for college-bound students

USciences professor provides infection control measures for college-bound students

Thousands of students across Greater Philadelphia will soon start the next chapter of their lives as they begin their college journeys away from home. [More]
New combination vaccine may reduce number of injections for young children

New combination vaccine may reduce number of injections for young children

A new combination vaccine may reduce the number of injections required to keep infants and toddlers up to date with the United States infant immunization schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a phase III trial reported in the August 2015 issue of Pediatrics, the vaccine was determined to be effective, safe and well-tolerated. Gary S. Marshall, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville, was the principal investigator of the multi-center trial and first author of the report. [More]
Increasing vaccination coverage in the US protects against chickenpox

Increasing vaccination coverage in the US protects against chickenpox

Since the chickenpox vaccine became available in the U.S. in 1995, there has been a large reduction in chickenpox cases. Hospitalizations and outpatient visits for chickenpox have continued their decline after a second dose of the vaccine was recommended to improve protection against the disease, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. [More]
CMC Biologics, PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative sign agreement for development of specific monoclonal antibodies

CMC Biologics, PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative sign agreement for development of specific monoclonal antibodies

CMC Biologics, a global leader in clinical and commercial development and contract manufacture of therapeutic proteins, announced today it has entered into an agreement with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) for process development and manufacture of specific monoclonal antibodies to test for their capacity to protect humans from malaria infection. [More]
Findings may lead to more accurate diagnostic test, possible vaccine for oral and genital herpes

Findings may lead to more accurate diagnostic test, possible vaccine for oral and genital herpes

Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers discover way to prevent flu infection without any help from the virus

Researchers discover way to prevent flu infection without any help from the virus

Researchers have discovered a way to trigger a preventive response to a flu infection without any help from the usual players - the virus itself or interferon, a powerful infection fighter. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement