Vaccine News and Research RSS Feed - Vaccine News and Research

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Mayo Clinic expert offers tips to avoid illness at major events

Mayo Clinic expert offers tips to avoid illness at major events

Zika isn't the only health concern now that the games have begun in Rio. Massive crowds from around the globe will be at the Olympics, and that means a world-class array of germs will mix with them. [More]
GSK launches educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis

GSK launches educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis

GSK today launched an educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis, a rare but potentially deadly disease. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Wistar scientists discover marker for PMN-MDSCs in the blood of cancer patients

Wistar scientists discover marker for PMN-MDSCs in the blood of cancer patients

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a population of immune cells that have been implicated in tumor resistance to various types of cancer treatment, including targeted therapies, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. [More]
Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

A month after announcing that two promising vaccine candidates provided mice with complete protection against the Zika virus, a research team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in collaboration with scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the University of São Paulo, now reports achieving complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys. [More]
Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

A joint University of Adelaide-Shanghai Jiao Tong University study has provided the first broad picture of the evolution and possible functions in the plant of pollen allergens. [More]
Researchers report promising vaccine strategy for immunizing against herpes viruses

Researchers report promising vaccine strategy for immunizing against herpes viruses

Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which both cause lifelong infection. HSV-2 infection is associated with increased risk for HIV infection. [More]
NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a clinical trial of a vaccine candidate intended to prevent Zika virus infection. [More]
PD-1-responsive T cells may offer clues to design more effective drugs for cancer

PD-1-responsive T cells may offer clues to design more effective drugs for cancer

Cancer immunotherapy drugs that block the inhibitory PD-1 pathway have shown success in clinical trials and are now FDA-approved for melanoma, lung cancer and bladder cancer. Yet many patients' tumors do not respond to these drugs. [More]
Griffith University to collaborate with Olymvax for new vaccine technology that could benefit millions

Griffith University to collaborate with Olymvax for new vaccine technology that could benefit millions

Griffith University will partner with a Chinese pharmaceutical, Olymvax Biopharmaceuticals Inc. for a new vaccine that could benefit millions. [More]
Vaccines unsuccessful in protecting obese mice against influenza infections, study finds

Vaccines unsuccessful in protecting obese mice against influenza infections, study finds

A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found that obese mice are not protected against influenza infections by vaccines that include adjuvants, raising concerns about vaccine effectiveness in obese humans who are known to be at an increased risk for severe flu. The findings appear today in the scientific journal mBio. [More]
Researchers shed light on mechanism for inducing memory B cell differentiation

Researchers shed light on mechanism for inducing memory B cell differentiation

A group of researchers at Immunology Frontier Research Center (IFReC), Osaka University and RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences jointly clarified the mechanism for inducing germinal-center B cells' differentiation into memory B cells, immune cells that remember antigens, at the molecular level. [More]
Scientists seeking blood donations from people exposed to arboviruses for dengue, Zika vaccine research

Scientists seeking blood donations from people exposed to arboviruses for dengue, Zika vaccine research

Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine are conducting studies that utilize blood donations from individuals who have been diagnosed with or potentially exposed to mosquito-borne viruses as part of ongoing dengue and Zika research and vaccine development. [More]
Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy can considerably reduce total HIV DNA levels

Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy can considerably reduce total HIV DNA levels

A team of researchers, led by Drs. Merlin Robb and Jintanat Ananworanich of the U.S. Military HIV Research Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, has found that when antiretroviral therapy (ART) is initiated during early acute HIV infection, it can significantly reduce total HIV DNA levels in the body, which may have implications for the goal of achieving long-term HIV remission. [More]
New report urges all European countries to adopt universal vaccination for hepatitis

New report urges all European countries to adopt universal vaccination for hepatitis

To coincide with World Hepatitis Day, a new report, commissioned by United European Gastroenterology, calls for all European countries to adopt universal vaccination and harmonised screening programmes for hepatitis, as well as improved neonatal screening, to help speed up the eradication of the disease. [More]
Researchers identify key immune differences that could help in development of effective HIV vaccine

Researchers identify key immune differences that could help in development of effective HIV vaccine

One of the main mysteries confounding development of an HIV vaccine is why some people infected with the virus make the desired antibodies after several years, but a vaccine can't seem to induce the same response. [More]
Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. [More]
Vaccination against single strain could confer protection against diverse Zika virus infections

Vaccination against single strain could confer protection against diverse Zika virus infections

Vaccination against a single strain of Zika virus should be sufficient to protect against genetically diverse strains of the virus, according to a study conducted by investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health; Washington University in St. Louis; and Emory University in Atlanta. [More]
World's largest public-private partnership focuses on tackling antibiotic resistance

World's largest public-private partnership focuses on tackling antibiotic resistance

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Wellcome Trust of London, the AMR Centre of Alderley Park, Cheshire in the United Kingdom and Boston University School of Law today announced the establishment of one of the world's largest public-private partnerships focused on tackling antibiotic resistance, an emerging modern threat to public health worldwide. [More]
MIT researchers develop portable device to manufacture biopharmaceuticals on demand

MIT researchers develop portable device to manufacture biopharmaceuticals on demand

For medics on the battlefield and doctors in remote or developing parts of the world, getting rapid access to the drugs needed to treat patients can be challenging. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement