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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Engineering single-celled parasite in cat's intestine as cancer vaccine

Engineering single-celled parasite in cat's intestine as cancer vaccine

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a single-celled parasite that is happiest in a cat's intestines, but it can live in any warm blooded animal. Found worldwide, T. gondii affects about one-third of the world's population, 60 million of which are Americans. [More]
New software-based method identifies patients with newly diagnosed HIV using EMRs

New software-based method identifies patients with newly diagnosed HIV using EMRs

A new, validated software-based method for identifying patients with newly diagnosed HIV using electronic medical records (EMRs) is described in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). [More]
Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Giving children under 5 years old an extra dose of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) helps to boost their immunity to the poliovirus and should be added to vaccination programmes in polio-endemic countries and those facing a high risk of imported cases, suggests new research published in The Lancet. [More]
CYD-TDV vaccine shows moderate protection against dengue in Asian children

CYD-TDV vaccine shows moderate protection against dengue in Asian children

The first dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) to reach phase 3 clinical testing has shown moderate protection (56%) against the disease in Asian children, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched an early-stage clinical trial of CRS3123, an investigational oral antibiotic intended to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection. [More]
FDA approves Protein Sciences' strain change amendment for Flublok influenza vaccine

FDA approves Protein Sciences' strain change amendment for Flublok influenza vaccine

Protein Sciences Corporation announced today that the FDA has approved the Company's strain change amendment for its seasonal influenza vaccine, Flublok. [More]
Study does not find association between HPV vaccination and increased risk of blood clot

Study does not find association between HPV vaccination and increased risk of blood clot

Although some data has suggested a potential association between receipt of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and subsequent venous thromboembolism (VTE; blood clot), an analysis that included more than 500,000 women who received the vaccine did not find an increased risk of VTE, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA. [More]

Survey shows biggest barrier to receiving Human Papillomavirus vaccine

A survey of first-year Grand Valley State University students showed the biggest barrier to receiving a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was moral or religious beliefs, or a perceived promotion of sexual behavior, according to graduate physician assistant researchers. [More]
FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy status to Novartis' CTL019 for treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL

FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy status to Novartis' CTL019 for treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL

Novartis announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has granted Breakthrough Therapy status to CTL019, an investigational chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy for the treatment of pediatric and adult patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL). [More]
Penn’s immunotherapy receives FDA's Breakthrough Therapy designation for ALL treatment

Penn’s immunotherapy receives FDA's Breakthrough Therapy designation for ALL treatment

A University of Pennsylvania-developed personalized immunotherapy has been awarded the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment of relapsed and refractory adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
Digital mammograms may not be better at diagnosing older women, study finds

Digital mammograms may not be better at diagnosing older women, study finds

The Yale review adds to the mixed report card on digital mammography, reports NPR. Meanwhile, big increases in vaccination prices are straining public health budgets and creating dilemmas for some doctors, finds The New York Times. [More]
First Edition: July 3,2014

First Edition: July 3,2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including more analysis of the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and concerns in New York about significant insurance rate increases for 2015. [More]

State highlights: Ore. mediation for medical errors; Mich. home-help aides

A mediation program spearheaded by Gov. John Kitzhaber went into effect Tuesday, giving patients and their families an option besides suing when medical errors happen. But questions remain over how the mediation program will develop, including whether hospitals, doctors and other providers will take advantage of the program, or candidly discuss errors if they do. The result of a compromise between trial lawyers and the Oregon Medical Association approved in SB 483 last year, the Early Discussion and Resolution program is intended to cut down on lawsuits and boost the reporting of medical errors to help improve health care practices (Budnick, 7/1). [More]
Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Leading immunologists expect to see some clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis, an infectious disease that is widespread the world over. Professor Stefan Kaufmann, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, echoed these sentiments at today's launch of the scientific programme for the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting at Lindau, Germany. [More]
Prophage autologous cancer vaccine extends survival in patients with newly diagnosed GBM

Prophage autologous cancer vaccine extends survival in patients with newly diagnosed GBM

Agenus Inc., announced final results from a single-arm, multi-institutional, open-label, Phase 2 study showing that patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who received Agenus' Prophage autologous cancer vaccine added to the standard of care treatment, lived nearly twice as long as expected. [More]
Viewpoints: Nothing in health care is free; Obamacare opponents lack facts; 'Nurse Jackie' and the ER

Viewpoints: Nothing in health care is free; Obamacare opponents lack facts; 'Nurse Jackie' and the ER

The Department of Health and Human Services released a report Friday declaring that 76 million Americans with private insurance became eligible for more preventive services with no out-of-pocket fees as a result of the 2010 healthcare law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare). Because Democrats are counting on female voters to help them at the polls in November, the report highlighted how women had been helped by that aspect of Obamacare. [More]
Host-directed therapy: A new type of TB treatment

Host-directed therapy: A new type of TB treatment

In a new study published in Nature, scientists describe a new type of tuberculosis (TB) treatment that involves manipulating the body's response to TB bacteria rather than targeting the bacteria themselves, a concept called host-directed therapy. [More]
New estimates highlight the importance of developing norovirus vaccines

New estimates highlight the importance of developing norovirus vaccines

Noroviruses are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (diarrhoea and vomiting) across all age groups, responsible for almost a fifth (18%) of all cases worldwide. New estimates, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, highlight the importance of developing norovirus vaccines, say the authors. [More]