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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
AS03 and MF59 adjuvants increase immune responses to two doses of H7N9 influenza vaccine

AS03 and MF59 adjuvants increase immune responses to two doses of H7N9 influenza vaccine

In a phase 2 trial that included nearly 1,000 adults, the AS03 and MF59 adjuvants (a component that improves immune response of inactivated influenza vaccines) increased the immune responses to two doses of an inactivated H7N9 influenza vaccine, with AS03-adjuvanted formulations inducing the highest amount of antibody response, according to a study in the July 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
InnaVirVax presents positive results of IVVAC-3S/P1 study at International AIDS Society Conference

InnaVirVax presents positive results of IVVAC-3S/P1 study at International AIDS Society Conference

InnaVirVax, a biopharmaceutical company specialized in research and development of therapeutic and diagnostic solutions for major infectious and chronic diseases, today announced the overall results of its Phase I/IIa clinical study of its VAC-3S immunotherapy, which is currently in development. [More]
Researchers devise way to induce protective immunity in mice against influenza viruses

Researchers devise way to induce protective immunity in mice against influenza viruses

A vaccine that protects against a wide variety of influenza viruses (a so-called universal flu vaccine) is a critical public health goal given the significant rates of illness and death caused by seasonal influenza and the potentially devastating effects of a pandemic influenza strain. [More]
Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

Zach feels "pretty good." Sam wants to be "done with shots!" And Tyler finds it helps to "just keep thinking that at least I'm getting out of school." They are normal boys who had normal lives until cancer came into the picture. All have faced the disease for two years or more, with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. All were diagnosed with various malignant solid tumors, went into remission and then relapsed. [More]
GSK starts shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) to US healthcare providers

GSK starts shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) to US healthcare providers

GSK announced today it has begun shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) doses to US healthcare providers, following licensing and lot-release approval from the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. [More]
Georgia researchers develop new tools to genetically manipulate parasite that causes cryptosporidiosis

Georgia researchers develop new tools to genetically manipulate parasite that causes cryptosporidiosis

Researchers at the University of Georgia have developed new tools to study and genetically manipulate cryptosporidium, a microscopic parasite that causes the diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis. [More]
Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

A Canadian research team at the IRCM in Montreal, led by molecular virologist Eric A. Cohen, PhD, made a significant discovery on how HIV escapes the body's antiviral responses. The team uncovered how an HIV viral protein known as Vpu tricks the immune system by using its own regulatory process to evade the host's first line of defence. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Healthy brain, muscle, eye and heart cells would improve the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world with debilitating mitochondrial diseases. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have gotten one step closer to making such cures a reality: they've turned cells from patients into healthy, mutation-free stem cells that can then become any cell type. [More]
Oxford University performs second phase of experimental Ebola vaccine trial

Oxford University performs second phase of experimental Ebola vaccine trial

Oxford University doctors and scientists are performing the second phase of clinical studies of an experimental Ebola vaccine regimen. The study is part of the EBOVAC2 project, a collaborative programme involving the University of Oxford, French Institute of Health and Medical Research as project coordinator, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Le Centre Muraz, Inserm Transfert and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. [More]
New dissolvable microneedle patch could make flu vaccination easier, safer and less painful

New dissolvable microneedle patch could make flu vaccination easier, safer and less painful

Flu vaccines delivered using microneedles that dissolve in the skin can protect people against infection even better than the standard needle-delivered vaccine, according to new research published in Biomaterials. The authors of the study, from Osaka University in Japan, say their dissolvable patch - the only vaccination system of its kind - could make vaccination easier, safer and less painful. [More]
New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected respiratory pathogens in U.S. adults hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study released today and conducted by researchers at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and hospitals in Chicago and Nashville, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]

Only two states in U.S. require HPV vaccination

An examination of state vaccination requirements for adolescents finds that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is currently required in only two states, many fewer than another vaccine associated with sexual transmission (hepatitis B) and another primarily recommended for adolescents (meningococcal conjugate), according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
Ebola vaccine study begins in Dakar, Senegal

Ebola vaccine study begins in Dakar, Senegal

A trial to evaluate an Ebola vaccine has begun in Dakar, Senegal, after initial immunisations started at the Jenner Institute, Oxford University. The announcement comes as a conference in Oxford discusses the global response to Ebola and the implications for future drug and vaccine development. [More]
Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

The Salk Institute today announced that Rusty Gage, Salk professor in the Laboratory of Genetics, has been selected as one of five recipients of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation's Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) program and will be awarded $1.5 million to conduct his research. These researchers have projects aimed at uncovering the elusive biological foundations of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New study identifies potential antidepressant medications with few side effects

New study identifies potential antidepressant medications with few side effects

A new study by researchers at University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified promising compounds that could successfully treat depression in less than 24 hours while minimizing side effects. Although they have not yet been tested in people, the compounds could offer significant advantages over current antidepressant medications. [More]
New UW-Madison study links two unrelated cancer treatments

New UW-Madison study links two unrelated cancer treatments

A new study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has linked two seemingly unrelated cancer treatments that are both now being tested in clinical trials. [More]
VUMC becomes Human Vaccines Project's first scientific hub

VUMC becomes Human Vaccines Project's first scientific hub

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the Human Vaccines Project and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative are pleased to announce that VUMC has become the Project's first scientific hub. [More]
Turnstone announces ongoing enrollment of Marabex clinical trial

Turnstone announces ongoing enrollment of Marabex clinical trial

Turnstone Biologics Inc., a FACIT portfolio company, has announced the ongoing enrollment of the Marabex clinical trial assessing the safety and immune responses in patients with advanced or metastatic, MAGE-A3-expressing solid tumours. [More]
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