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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Glioblastoma is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor, and despite advances in standard treatment, the median survival is about 15 months (compared to 4 months without treatment). [More]
Genticel completes patient enrollment for ProCervix phase II study

Genticel completes patient enrollment for ProCervix phase II study

Genticel, a French biotechnology company and leading developer of therapeutic vaccines, today announces the completion of patient enrollment of the phase II study of its lead therapeutic vaccine candidate, ProCervix. [More]
Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. [More]
Experimental Ebola treatments to be trialled in West Africa next month

Experimental Ebola treatments to be trialled in West Africa next month

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have announced that three trials of Ebola therapies will begin in West Africa this December. [More]
Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Scientists from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology have used the power of new genomic technology to discover that microbes that commonly infect the eye have special, previously unknown properties. These properties are predicted to allow the bacterium -- Streptococcus pneumoniae -- to specifically stick to the surface of the eye, grow, and cause damage and inflammation. [More]
Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Among approximately 26,000 women, receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery or small-for-gestational-age birth or with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, although a small increased risk of being diagnosed with chorioamnionitis (an inflammation of the membranes that surround the fetus) was observed, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study reveals ETEC bacteria's genetic composition

Study reveals ETEC bacteria's genetic composition

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are responsible each year for around 400 million cases of diarrhoea and 400,000 deaths in the world's low- and middle-income countries. Children under the age of five are most affected. [More]
Griffith University receives significant funding boost to combat pneumonia

Griffith University receives significant funding boost to combat pneumonia

Griffith University’s bid to fight the childhood killer pneumonia has received a significant boost following the award of a $304,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

A national survey from Rite Aid and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases reveals that the majority of adult women living in the United States do not believe they are up to date on vaccinations to protect against many preventable diseases. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
LSTM receives research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

LSTM receives research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

Respiratory specialists at Liverpool School Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have been awarded two substantial research grants to further develop and utilise their Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage (EHPC) model. [More]
UF Health researcher finds way to grow human norovirus

UF Health researcher finds way to grow human norovirus

Noroviruses are pernicious intestinal viruses. They cause violent vomiting and diarrhea, and people ill with the virus remain contagious up to three days after they seem to recover. [More]
Worst effects of reperfusion injury after heart attack may be prevented with iodide

Worst effects of reperfusion injury after heart attack may be prevented with iodide

Blocked arteries are typically the trigger, stopping the flow of blood and starving the heart muscle of oxygen. But when the blockage is removed and the blood comes rushing back, it wreaks havoc of its own. The result is called reperfusion injury, a life-threatening flood of inflammation and cellular destruction that has stumped scientists for 40 years. [More]
New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

In a new study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget researchers from Uppsala University show that a therapeutic vaccine directed against tumor vessels can reduce tumor burden and suppress formation of spontaneous lung metastases in a mouse model for metastatic breast cancer. [More]
LSTM awarded research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

LSTM awarded research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

Respiratory specialists at Liverpool School Tropical Medicine have been awarded two substantial research grants to further develop and utilise their Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage (EHPC) model. [More]
Salk Institute researchers heal injured hearts of living mice

Salk Institute researchers heal injured hearts of living mice

Researchers at the Salk Institute have healed injured hearts of living mice by reactivating long dormant molecular machinery found in the animals' cells, a finding that could help pave the way to new therapies for heart disorders in humans. [More]
Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Fall in the United States means residents in most of the country will see fewer mosquitoes and less risk of the diseases they spread. However, the chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean and Central and South American countries continues to spread with no sign of slowing down. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the painful mosquito-borne disease will likely continue to infect travelers to the region during the rest of this year and beyond. [More]
Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Despite evidence that cervical cancer screening saves lives, about eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened. [More]
Non-injectable vaccine may provide long-term protection against deadly Ebola virus

Non-injectable vaccine may provide long-term protection against deadly Ebola virus

A potentially breathable, respiratory vaccine in development has been shown to provide long-term protection for non-human primates against the deadly Ebola virus, as reported this week in the online edition of the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics. [More]

Nasal vaccine shows promise against Ebola virus

A nasal vaccine in development by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has been shown to provide long-term protection for non-human primates against the deadly Ebola virus. Results from a small pre-clinical study represent the only proof to date that a single dose of a non-injectable vaccine platform for Ebola is long-lasting, which could have significant global implications in controlling future outbreaks. [More]