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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease. However, most cervical cancers are preventable through immunization against the human papillomavirus (HPV). A pivotal international phase 2/3 clinical trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center faculty demonstrated that vaccination with Gardasil 9 protects against nine HPV types, seven of which cause most cases of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease. [More]
Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

The average heart beats 35 million times a year - 2.5 billion times over a lifetime. Those beats must be precisely calibrated; even a small divergence from the metronomic rhythm can cause sudden death. For decades, scientists have wondered exactly how the heart stays so precisely on rhythm even though it contains so many moving parts. [More]
Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines are designed to turn the body's own immune system specifically against tumor cells. Particularly promising are vaccines that are directed against so-called neoantigens: These are proteins that have undergone a genetic mutation in tumor cells and, therefore, differ from their counterparts in healthy cells. [More]
Study compares two different methods of blood transfusion in trauma care

Study compares two different methods of blood transfusion in trauma care

The University of Maryland School of Medicine is part of a new nationwide, multi-site study that may help save hundreds of lives among trauma patients with major bleeding. The study, which was published earlier this month in JAMA, compared two different methods of blood transfusion, and found that one approach gave patients a significantly better chance of survival within the first 24 hours. [More]
Scientists develop promising new HIV vaccine agent

Scientists develop promising new HIV vaccine agent

In a study that involved researchers from over a dozen institutions, the anti-HIV agent protected monkeys from every strain of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) for at least 34 weeks. [More]
IDRI Announces $4M BARDA Cooperative Agreement To Establish Adjuvant Hub

IDRI Announces $4M BARDA Cooperative Agreement To Establish Adjuvant Hub

The international outbreak of Ebola in 2014 serves as a reminder for the need to be proactive in preparing for the rapid spread of any newly emerging or re-emerging infectious disease. IDRI today announces it has received $4 million in funding from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, to develop an adjuvant manufacturing hub with both preclinical and clinical expertise to facilitate pandemic influenza preparedness in developing countries. [More]
New nine-valent HPV vaccine has potential to dramatically reduce cervical cancer rates

New nine-valent HPV vaccine has potential to dramatically reduce cervical cancer rates

A multinational study on a diverse group of women shows that a new nine-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents infections and disease associated with the vaccine types, according to a paper published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
HIV Prevention Trials Network launches two phase 2 studies to evaluate new HIV drugs

HIV Prevention Trials Network launches two phase 2 studies to evaluate new HIV drugs

The HIV Prevention Trials Network has launched two new phase 2 studies, HPTN 076 and HPTN 077, which are designed to evaluate new drugs to protect people from getting infected with HIV. [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

Two new clinical trials are examining the safety and acceptability of antiretroviral medicines administered via injection as a means of protecting against HIV infection. The studies are being funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN). [More]
NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis (TB) research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network. [More]
New clinical trial launched in South Africa to study investigational HIV vaccine regimen

New clinical trial launched in South Africa to study investigational HIV vaccine regimen

A clinical trial called HVTN 100 has been launched in South Africa to study an investigational HIV vaccine regimen for safety and the immune responses it generates in study participants. This experimental vaccine regimen is based on the one tested in the U.S. Military HIV Research Program-led RV144 clinical trial in Thailand--the first study to demonstrate that a vaccine can protect people from HIV infection. [More]
UCSD researchers make new attempt to develop malaria vaccine candidate

UCSD researchers make new attempt to develop malaria vaccine candidate

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine used algae as a mini-factory to produce a malaria parasite protein. The algae-produced protein, paired with an immune-boosting cocktail suitable for use in humans, generated antibodies in mice that nearly eliminated mosquito infection by the malaria parasite. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new drug candidate against HIV

TSRI scientists develop new drug candidate against HIV

In a remarkable new advance against the virus that causes AIDS, scientists from the Jupiter, Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have announced the creation of a novel drug candidate that is so potent and universally effective, it might work as part of an unconventional vaccine. [More]
Wistar researchers identify new therapeutic target for aggressive form of ovarian cancer

Wistar researchers identify new therapeutic target for aggressive form of ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all cancers affecting the female reproductive system with very few effective treatments available. Prognosis is even worse among patients with certain subtypes of the disease. Now, researchers at The Wistar Institute have identified a new therapeutic target in a particularly aggressive form of ovarian cancer, paving the way for what could be the first effective targeted therapy of its kind for the disease. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
NTU Singapore setting up new institute to find cures for human diseases

NTU Singapore setting up new institute to find cures for human diseases

Nanyang Technological University is setting up a new institute to advance research in the life sciences, with a focus on ramping up Singapore's efforts in finding cures for human diseases. [More]
Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts, such as West Nile virus and Ebola, is a predictable result of climate change, says a noted zoologist affiliated with the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. [More]
Henry Ford physicians suction cancerous tumor from vein in metastatic kidney cancer patient

Henry Ford physicians suction cancerous tumor from vein in metastatic kidney cancer patient

Physicians at Henry Ford Hospital successfully suctioned a cancerous tumor from a major vein in a patient with metastatic kidney cancer, clearing the way for him to undergo a minimally-invasive kidney removal. This allowed him to participate in a clinical trial using genetic material from his tumor to produce a vaccine to help fight his metastatic disease. [More]
Cervarix effective against other common cancer-causing HPVs

Cervarix effective against other common cancer-causing HPVs

According to a multinational clinical trial involving nearly 20,000 young women, the human papilloma virus vaccine, Cervarix, not only has the potential to prevent cervical cancer, but was effective against other common cancer-causing human papillomaviruses, aside from just the two HPV types, 16 and 18, which are responsible for about 70 percent of all cases. [More]