Vaccine News and Research RSS Feed - Vaccine News and Research

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

The wait is over. Verizon is proud to announce the winners of Verizon's 2014 Powerful Answers Award, three in each of the following categories: education, health care, sustainability and transportation. [More]
Children born prematurely need to be placed in a priority group for seasonal flu vaccination

Children born prematurely need to be placed in a priority group for seasonal flu vaccination

Children born prematurely are at an increased risk of flu-related complications, despite not being identified as an “at risk” group in UK, USA, or WHO guidelines, and should be a priority group for the seasonal flu vaccination, new research published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine suggests. [More]
Corrective information can successfully reduce false beliefs about flu vaccines

Corrective information can successfully reduce false beliefs about flu vaccines

With health systems in the U.S., U.K., and around the world trying to increase vaccination levels, it is critical to understand how to address vaccine hesitancy and counter myths about vaccine safety. A new article in the journal "Vaccine" concludes, however, that correcting myths about vaccines may not be the most effective approach to promoting immunization among vaccine skeptics. [More]
March of Dimes Celebration of Babies event raises record $1.1 million

March of Dimes Celebration of Babies event raises record $1.1 million

March of Dimes, the leading non-profit organization for pregnancy and baby health, raised a record $1.1 million at their 9th annual March of Dimes Celebration of Babies: A Hollywood Luncheon event today at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Los Angeles. The 2014 honorees were actor/filmmaker Elizabeth Banks, who was presented with the March of Dimes Grace Kelly Award and Elizabeth Gabler, President, Fox 2000 who was named the March of Dimes Inspiring Woman of the Year. [More]
Study sheds light on common psychosocial barriers affecting HPV vaccination in Puerto Rico

Study sheds light on common psychosocial barriers affecting HPV vaccination in Puerto Rico

Young Puerto Rican women and their mothers know little about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Researchers identify important neural mechanism responsible for certain chronic pain disorders

Researchers identify important neural mechanism responsible for certain chronic pain disorders

Pain typically has a clear cause-but not always. When a person touches something hot or bumps into a sharp object, it's no surprise that it hurts. But for people with certain chronic pain disorders, including fibromyalgia and phantom limb pain, a gentle caress can result in agony. [More]
Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

With the number of global cancer cases expected to increase by more than 50 percent by 2030, researchers around the globe have collaborated to create a new tool for global leaders to determine what actions they must take to better control cancer. [More]
MRIGlobal awarded $3 million contract to provide HPV vaccine

MRIGlobal awarded $3 million contract to provide HPV vaccine

MRIGlobal today announced that it has been awarded a $3 million contract amendment from the National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Program to provide a vaccine for the Human Papillomavirus or HPV, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. MRIGlobal will lead a team that will produce the vaccine to be used in a Phase I clinical trial. [More]
Organovo, Yale collaborate to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research

Organovo, Yale collaborate to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research

Organovo Holdings, Inc., a three-dimensional biology company focused on delivering breakthrough 3D bioprinting technology, and Yale School of Medicine, Department of Surgery have formed a collaboration to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research, made possible by a generous gift from the Methuselah Foundation. [More]
New WHO guidance provides cervical cancer control and prevention approach

New WHO guidance provides cervical cancer control and prevention approach

New guidance from WHO aims to help countries better prevent and control cervical cancer. The disease is one of the world's deadliest - but most easily preventable - forms of cancer for women, responsible for more than 270 000 deaths annually, 85% of which occur in developing countries. [More]
InnaVirVax receives DSMB recommendation to pursue VAC-3S Phase 2 study in HIV

InnaVirVax receives DSMB recommendation to pursue VAC-3S Phase 2 study in HIV

InnaVirVax, a biopharmaceutical company specialized in research and development on therapeutic and diagnostic solutions for diseases linked to immune dysregulation, today announces the recommendation of its independent Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB) to pursue the Phase 2 study (IPROTECT1) of VAC-3S according to the planned protocol. [More]
New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

People who have asthma generally suffer worse with colds caused by rhinoviruses than other people do. There are also asthmatics and patients with the severe lung condition COPD in whom the cold virus can trigger serious flare-ups of their condition. A team of researchers from the Institute of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research at the MedUni Vienna has now discovered how this risk group can be filtered out using a blood test. [More]
Leading experts to discuss specific strategies to combat Ebola

Leading experts to discuss specific strategies to combat Ebola

Where do we stand in the fight against Ebola -- and what should be done now? [More]
New vaccine shows promise in patients with metastatic breast cancer

New vaccine shows promise in patients with metastatic breast cancer

A breast cancer vaccine developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is safe in patients with metastatic breast cancer, results of an early clinical trial indicate. Preliminary evidence also suggests that the vaccine primed the patients' immune systems to attack tumor cells and helped slow the cancer's progression. [More]
Researchers use mathematical models to predict how immune cells respond to disease

Researchers use mathematical models to predict how immune cells respond to disease

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have defined for the first time how the size of the immune response is controlled, using mathematical models to predict how powerfully immune cells respond to infection and disease. [More]
UCL research opens up new way to treat neurological disorders

UCL research opens up new way to treat neurological disorders

The way that tetanus neurotoxin enters nerve cells has been discovered by UCL scientists, who showed that this process can be blocked, offering a potential therapeutic intervention for tetanus. This newly-discovered pathway could be exploited to deliver therapies to the nervous system, opening up a whole new way to treat neurological disorders such as motor neuron disease and peripheral neuropathies. [More]
Ebola vaccine shows promising results in human trial

Ebola vaccine shows promising results in human trial

An experimental vaccine against the Ebola virus has proved effective and well-tolerated in the first human trial of a candidate Ebola drug. [More]
New research brings personalized cancer vaccine approach one step closer to reality

New research brings personalized cancer vaccine approach one step closer to reality

In the near future, physicians may treat some cancer patients with personalized vaccines that spur their immune systems to attack malignant tumors. New research led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has brought the approach one step closer to reality. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a Phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. The candidate vaccine, which was co-developed by the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

Bernard Arulanandam, UTSA Jane and Roland Blumberg Professor in Biology and Assistant Vice President for Research Support, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Arulanandam was elected by his peers for the honor, recognizing his scientific and socially distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications. [More]