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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

​The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, last night won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]
Nearly 4 million infants die from vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide each year

Nearly 4 million infants die from vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide each year

Nearly 4 million children under 5 die from vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide each year, and two University of Michigan doctoral ecology students are working to change that. [More]

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research, Management Sciences

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, tonight won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]
Novel proteins may lead to new ways to combat venereal disease

Novel proteins may lead to new ways to combat venereal disease

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered novel proteins in, or on the surface of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, which offer a promising new avenue of attack against a venereal disease that is showing increased resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it. [More]
S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant cause of community-acquired pneumonia among children in Belgium, with non-vaccine serotypes accounting for the majority of cases, a Belgian study shows. [More]

Two doses of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix non-inferior to three-doses

A recent study in the journal Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, showed that two doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline) are non-inferior to three-doses in the current schedule. [More]
CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with health officials in Missouri and Tennessee have identified six new cases of people sick with Heartland virus: five in Missouri and one in Tennessee. The new cases, discovered in 2012 and 2013, are described today in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Experimental vaccine for HSV-2 infection reduces rate of viral shedding at 6 months

Experimental vaccine for HSV-2 infection reduces rate of viral shedding at 6 months

Updated Phase 1/2a results with GEN-003, a vaccine candidate under development by Genocea Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: GNCA) for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, showed the experimental vaccine to generate highly significant reductions in both the number of clinical lesion days and rate of viral shedding at six months after the final vaccine dose. [More]

Novel storage device transports vaccines to remote parts of the world

Getting life-saving vaccines to the most remote parts of the world is no easy feat. Biopharmaceuticals are highly sensitive to heat and cold and can perish if their temperature shifts a few degrees. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have identified a protein that regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. [More]

Inovio Pharmaceuticals receives three industry awards at World Vaccine Congress

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that it was recognized with three industry awards at the World Vaccine Congress, which is being held this week in Washington, D.C. The Vaccine Industry Excellence (ViE) Awards recognize outstanding vaccine advancements and achievements of therapeutic and preventive vaccine developers across the global industry as judged by a panel of global biotech industry stakeholders. [More]

HIV and Hepatitis C vaccines now closer to reality

Plans for a new type of DNA vaccine to protect against the deadly HIV and Hepatitis C viruses have taken an important step forward, with University of Adelaide researchers applying for a patent based on groundbreaking new research. [More]
ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

Roy Curtiss III, a scientist at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Radiation therapy fights cancer in more ways than one

Radiation therapy fights cancer in more ways than one

Radiation therapy fights cancer in more ways than one. Not only does it force cancer cells to self-destruct, but several studies demonstrate that it also activates the immune system to attack tumor cells. [More]

Study suggests that self-administration of influenza vaccine may be feasible with microneedle patch

There are many reasons some people may not get a flu shot, but would they be more likely to do so if there was a simple device that could be mailed directly to them, was easy enough to use by themselves, and provided at least the same level of protection as a traditional flu shot without the pain of a needle jab? A recent NIBIB-funded study, published online February 2014 in the journal Vaccine, suggests the answer is yes. [More]
Japanese mushroom extract active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) may have role in prevention HPV-related cancers

Japanese mushroom extract active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) may have role in prevention HPV-related cancers

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Highlights: N.Y. veterans' benefits; Ga. rural hospital deal; Ga. anti-Obamacare bill

A selection of health policy stories from New York, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota and Colorado. [More]

UC San Diego Library becomes official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk

The University of California, San Diego Library has become the official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk, noted physician, virologist, and humanitarian, best known for his development of the world's first successful vaccine for the prevention of polio. [More]
New treatment could halt progression of dementia

New treatment could halt progression of dementia

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a way to potentially halt the progression of dementia caused by accumulation of a protein known as tau. [More]
GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced three grants worth a total of US$6.8 million to speed the development of innovative drugs for some of the world’s most neglected diseases—schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and parasitic roundworms. [More]