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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

A multivalent candidate vaccine elicits broad antibody responses to a range of norovirus strains, including strains not included in the vaccine or previously encountered by participants, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
BIO KOREA celebrates 10th anniversary to share new information and technology in health industry

BIO KOREA celebrates 10th anniversary to share new information and technology in health industry

BIO KOREA is celebrating its 10th anniversary as a convention to share the latest information and technology in the health industry and to establish corporate partnerships among global experts. [More]
The fight continues to end tuberculosis

The fight continues to end tuberculosis

Today is World TB Day. The Centenary Institute is one of the leading medical research institutes in Australia championing the fight to put an end to this insidious disease. [More]
Rigontec raises €4.8 million in second closing of Series A financing round

Rigontec raises €4.8 million in second closing of Series A financing round

Rigontec GmbH, a privately held biopharmaceutical company developing RNA-based immunotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer and viral diseases, today announces it has raised €4.8 million in a second closing of its Series A financing round from Forbion Capital Partners, a Dutch life-sciences venture capital firm, and Sunstone Capital, a Copenhagen based venture capital investor. [More]
Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the current journal of Science Advances. [More]
Discovery may lead to new potential treatment for drug-resistant melanoma

Discovery may lead to new potential treatment for drug-resistant melanoma

In the last several years, targeted therapies - drugs that directly impact specific genes and proteins involved in the progression of cancer - have been approved for a wide variety of cancers, including melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Now, researchers at The Wistar Institute have discovered one way in which melanoma becomes resistant to a particular form of targeted therapy, and understanding this phenomenon may lead to a new melanoma target or prompt new designs of these treatments. [More]
WHO calls for intensification of routine immunization services in all Ebola-affected areas

WHO calls for intensification of routine immunization services in all Ebola-affected areas

A growing risk of outbreaks of measles, pertussis, and other vaccine-preventable diseases in countries affected by Ebola must be countered by urgent scaling up of routine immunization activities, according to the World Health Organization. [More]
Researchers find way to enhance effects of immunotherapy in glioblastoma

Researchers find way to enhance effects of immunotherapy in glioblastoma

When cancer strikes, it may be possible for patients to fight back with their own defenses, using a strategy known as immunotherapy. According to a new study published in Nature, researchers have found a way to enhance the effects of this therapeutic approach in glioblastoma, a deadly type of brain cancer, and possibly improve patient outcomes. [More]
UL GEMS students host third annual Teddy Bear Hospital event for primary school children

UL GEMS students host third annual Teddy Bear Hospital event for primary school children

Medical School students at the University of Limerick today hosted the University’s annual Teddy Bear Hospital (TBH) with over 400 Limerick’s primary school children from 6 different schools and their teddy bears. The aim of the event, which has been organised by six current Graduate Entry Medical School (GEMS) students with a particular interest in childhood medicine, is to alleviate childhood anxiety about the medical environment, its procedures and the professionals that work within it. [More]
First clinical trial of new malaria vaccine held in Equatorial Guinea

First clinical trial of new malaria vaccine held in Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea has held the first clinical trial of a new malaria vaccine known as PfSPZ. Three volunteers participated this month in the trial of the vaccine, which was developed by the American biotechnology company Sanaria. The trial took place at the La Paz Medical Center, the country's premier medical facility, located in Sipopo, just outside the capital. [More]
PVNF gifts $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern

PVNF gifts $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern

Presbyterian Village North Foundation has made two gifts totaling $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Inadequate vaccine coverage drives Disneyland measles outbreak

Inadequate vaccine coverage drives Disneyland measles outbreak

Inadequate vaccine coverage is likely a driving force behind the ongoing Disneyland measles outbreak, according to calculations by a research team at Boston Children's Hospital. [More]
New vaccine for post exposure treatment of rabies infection enters human clinical trial

New vaccine for post exposure treatment of rabies infection enters human clinical trial

Yisheng Biopharma Co., Ltd., a biopharmaceutical company focusing on the research, development, manufacturing, sales and marketing of vaccine products, announced that a new vaccine for the post exposure treatment of the rabies infection was entering human clinical trial after a six-year long collaboration with a number of research institutes worldwide. [More]
60,000 children in need of immediate assistance after Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu; at least 72,000 out of school

60,000 children in need of immediate assistance after Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu; at least 72,000 out of school

With Tropical Cyclone Pam ripping through Vanuatu from late Friday night (13th March) into the early hours of Saturday morning, UNICEF Pacific reminds that 45% of the population is children and they are particularly vulnerable in any emergency. [More]
Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

A flu vaccine given just under the surface of the skin that includes four strains of inactivated influenza could be more protective than a similar flu vaccine containing only three strains, Saint Louis University research found. [More]
Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that major disruptions in the health care systems in West Africa caused by the Ebola crisis have led to significant decreases in vaccinations for childhood diseases, increasing susceptibility to measles and other vaccine-preventable illnesses. [More]
New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

An extensive database identifying immune traits, such as how immune cell function is regulated at the genetic level in healthy people, is reported by researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators in the journal Cell. [More]
Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

For infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), something as simple as a common cold or ear infection can be fatal. Born with an incomplete immune system, kids who have SCID--also known as "bubble boy" or "bubble baby" disease--can't fight off even the mildest of germs. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
Pressure BioSciences introduces PCT-HD System to global proteomics market

Pressure BioSciences introduces PCT-HD System to global proteomics market

Pressure BioSciences, Inc., a leader in the development and sale of broadly enabling, pressure cycling technology ("PCT")-based sample preparation solutions to the worldwide life sciences industry, today announced the commercial release of the PCT-HD system. [More]
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