Vaccine News and Research RSS Feed - Vaccine News and Research

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Pilot study shows that anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV

Pilot study shows that anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV

A pilot study by HIV researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark has shown that an anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV. [More]
Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

On July 5, 2011, a massive wall of dust, ("haboob," in Arabic), blanketed Phoenix, Arizona, creating an awesome spectacle, (or stubborn nuisance, depending on your perspective). Dust storms are a common occurrence in the arid desert environments of the American Southwest. [More]
Advaxis, MedImmune team up for immuno-oncology clinical trial

Advaxis, MedImmune team up for immuno-oncology clinical trial

Advaxis, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing cancer immunotherapies, has entered into a clinical trial collaboration with MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca. [More]
Glide Pharma announces successful completion of pre-clinical proof-of-concept study with novel solid formulation of octreotide acetate

Glide Pharma announces successful completion of pre-clinical proof-of-concept study with novel solid formulation of octreotide acetate

Glide Pharma, the pharmaceutical development and device company focused on solid dose formulations of therapeutics and vaccines, today announced that its novel solid formulation of octreotide acetate achieved successful results in a pre-clinical proof-of-concept study comparing it with the currently marketed liquid product (Sandostatin®). [More]
New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

Researchers at the University of Arkansas have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to develop new molecules and biopharmaceuticals that enhance a patient's immune response against tumors. [More]
Discovery presents new challenges for HIV eradication efforts

Discovery presents new challenges for HIV eradication efforts

The most critical barrier for curing HIV-1 infection is the presence of the viral reservoir, the cells in which the HIV virus can lie dormant for many years and avoid elimination by antiretroviral drugs. Very little has been known about when and where the viral reservoir is established during acute HIV-1 infection, or the extent to which it is susceptible to early antiretroviral therapy (ART). [More]
Chikungunya virus transmission occurs in Florida for the first time

Chikungunya virus transmission occurs in Florida for the first time

The chikungunya virus, which is transmitted to people by mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus), was found for the first time in the Americas on islands in the Caribbean in December 2013. Yesterday, the first case of chikungunya in the continental United States was reported in a man from Florida who had not recently travelled outside the United States. [More]
Researchers find viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1 using fossil virus

Researchers find viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1 using fossil virus

The road to finding a cure for HIV-1 is not without obstacles. However, thanks to cutting-edge research by Douglas Nixon, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues, performed at the George Washington University (GW), Oregon Health & Science University, the University of Rochester, and UC San Francisco, the scientific community is one step closer to finding a viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1, using an immune attack against a fossil virus buried in the genome. [More]
Researchers identify key explanation for why immune system unsuccessful in killing HIV virus

Researchers identify key explanation for why immune system unsuccessful in killing HIV virus

Our immune system contains CD8+ T cells which protect us from various diseases such as cancer and viruses. Some of them are specifically tasked with killing cells infected with the HIV virus - and researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, together with international colleagues, have for the first time identified a key explanation for why these cells are unsuccessful in their task. [More]
Phase II study reveals potential biomarker for HIV vaccine

Phase II study reveals potential biomarker for HIV vaccine

Further analysis of a Phase II study of therapeutic HIV vaccine candidate Vacc-4x revealed a potential biomarker associated with participants who experienced a more profound viral load reduction after receiving the vaccine. [More]
Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. [More]
GSK begins shipment of flu vaccines to U.S. for the upcoming 2014-15 season

GSK begins shipment of flu vaccines to U.S. for the upcoming 2014-15 season

GSK announced today it has begun shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) doses to U.S. healthcare providers. This is the first shipment of GSK’s U.S. flu vaccine supply for the flu season, following licensing and lot-release approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. [More]
Researchers develop world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease

Researchers develop world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease

Researchers at Wayne State University have made a fundamental discovery and, in subsequent collaboration with scientists at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LIAI), are one step closer to the goal of developing the world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease - the number one killer in the nation. [More]
Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. [More]
Scientists sequence genome of Asian liver fluke, a cancer-causing parasite

Scientists sequence genome of Asian liver fluke, a cancer-causing parasite

Scientists have sequenced the genome and characterised the genes of the Asian liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. This parasite causes diseases that affect millions of people in Asia and is associated with a fatal bile duct cancer. [More]
Engineering single-celled parasite in cat's intestine as cancer vaccine

Engineering single-celled parasite in cat's intestine as cancer vaccine

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a single-celled parasite that is happiest in a cat's intestines, but it can live in any warm blooded animal. Found worldwide, T. gondii affects about one-third of the world's population, 60 million of which are Americans. [More]
New software-based method identifies patients with newly diagnosed HIV using EMRs

New software-based method identifies patients with newly diagnosed HIV using EMRs

A new, validated software-based method for identifying patients with newly diagnosed HIV using electronic medical records (EMRs) is described in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). [More]
Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Extra dose of polio vaccine boosts immunity in children under 5 years old

Giving children under 5 years old an extra dose of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) helps to boost their immunity to the poliovirus and should be added to vaccination programmes in polio-endemic countries and those facing a high risk of imported cases, suggests new research published in The Lancet. [More]