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A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.
Research team to investigate ways to develop novel immune therapies for HPV-associated cancers

Research team to investigate ways to develop novel immune therapies for HPV-associated cancers

Stand Up To Cancer and the Farrah Fawcett Foundation, along with the American Association for Cancer Research, SU2C's Scientific Partner, announced the formation of a research team dedicated to HPV-related cancers during a press event today at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, held here April 5-9. [More]

Small financial incentives can improve people’s completion of HBV vaccination, study finds

Small financial incentives, totalling as little as £30, can dramatically increase the likelihood of people who inject drugs completing a course of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Moffitt Cancer Center initiates phase I clinical trial of cancer vaccine ID-G305

Moffitt Cancer Center initiates phase I clinical trial of cancer vaccine ID-G305

Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person's own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites. [More]
Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Adult patients with diabetes who trust their medical provider and feel included in treatment decisions are significantly more likely to take and maintain a newly prescribed antidepressant medication, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Scientists uncover surprising link between brain development and gene tied to breast cancer

Scientists uncover surprising link between brain development and gene tied to breast cancer

Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details into a surprising-and crucial-link between brain development and a gene whose mutation is tied to breast and ovarian cancer. [More]
SU2C and Farrah Fawcett announce formation of research team dedicated to HPV-related cancers

SU2C and Farrah Fawcett announce formation of research team dedicated to HPV-related cancers

Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) and the Farrah Fawcett Foundation, along with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), SU2C's Scientific Partner, announced the formation of a research team dedicated to HPV-related cancers during a press event today at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, held here April 5-9. [More]
Bezos family gifts $20M to Fred Hutchinson scientists for development of novel cancer immunotherapies

Bezos family gifts $20M to Fred Hutchinson scientists for development of novel cancer immunotherapies

​Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientists striving for new cancer cures - and the patients who stand to benefit from them - got an enormous boost today when the Bezos family committed $20 million to support the development of novel cancer immunotherapies. It is the largest single contribution in Fred Hutch's history. [More]
Patients' risk of stroke increases following shingles, but antiviral drugs appear to offer protection

Patients' risk of stroke increases following shingles, but antiviral drugs appear to offer protection

Patients' risk of stroke significantly increased following the first signs of shingles, but antiviral drugs appeared to offer some protection, according to a new study in Clinical Infectious Diseases, now available online. [More]
Humans appear to develop immunity against strain-specific Lyme disease that lasts for years

Humans appear to develop immunity against strain-specific Lyme disease that lasts for years

Lyme disease, if not treated promptly with antibiotics, can become a lingering problem for those infected. But a new study led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania has some brighter news: Once infected with a particular strain of the disease-causing bacteria, humans appear to develop immunity against that strain that can last six to nine years. [More]
Sanaria receives 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for "Best Prophylactic Vaccine"

Sanaria receives 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for "Best Prophylactic Vaccine"

Sanaria received the 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for the "Best Prophylactic Vaccine" at a ceremony held March 25 in Washington DC during the 14th World Vaccine Congress. [More]
Frail elderly people are at increased risk of death from outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis

Frail elderly people are at increased risk of death from outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis

Frail elderly people living in residential care facilities are at increased risk of severe illness or death from outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis. [More]
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of Adacel® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]
CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

​The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, last night won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]

Nearly 4 million infants die from vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide each year

Nearly 4 million children under 5 die from vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide each year, and two University of Michigan doctoral ecology students are working to change that. [More]

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research, Management Sciences

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, tonight won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]
Novel proteins may lead to new ways to combat venereal disease

Novel proteins may lead to new ways to combat venereal disease

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered novel proteins in, or on the surface of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, which offer a promising new avenue of attack against a venereal disease that is showing increased resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it. [More]
S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant cause of community-acquired pneumonia among children in Belgium, with non-vaccine serotypes accounting for the majority of cases, a Belgian study shows. [More]

Two doses of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix non-inferior to three-doses

A recent study in the journal Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, showed that two doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline) are non-inferior to three-doses in the current schedule. [More]

CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with health officials in Missouri and Tennessee have identified six new cases of people sick with Heartland virus: five in Missouri and one in Tennessee. The new cases, discovered in 2012 and 2013, are described today in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]

Experimental vaccine for HSV-2 infection reduces rate of viral shedding at 6 months

Updated Phase 1/2a results with GEN-003, a vaccine candidate under development by Genocea Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: GNCA) for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, showed the experimental vaccine to generate highly significant reductions in both the number of clinical lesion days and rate of viral shedding at six months after the final vaccine dose. [More]