Two studies investigate role of oxygen in cell transplantation

Published on November 17, 2012 at 1:44 AM · No Comments

Two studies published in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (21:7), now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/, investigate the role of oxygen in cell transplantation.

In a study carried out at Baylor University, researchers concerned about the poor efficacy of islet cell transplantation during pancreas preservation and islet isolation have found that low temperatures can prevent hypoxia (low oxygen) that can damage islet cells. In a second study, Brazilian researchers found that neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from skin fibroblasts of a schizophrenic patient show extra oxygen consumption and elevated levels of "reactive oxygen species."

Low temperature prevents hypoxia-induced damage

According to a Baylor University, Texas research team, a major problem in islet cell transplantation is the poor condition of islet cells attributed to hypoxia during cell preservation and isolation.

"Islet cells are highly sensitive to hypoxic conditions," said study co-author Dr. Shinichi Matsumoto of the Baylor Research Institute's Islet Cell Laboratory. "We hypothesized that low temperature conditions could prevent hypoxia induced islet cell damage since cold conditions prevented the release of high levels of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)."

Studies related to developing better results are limited, said the researchers, although cold preservation has been applied.

In this study, carried out using mouse models, the research team stored islets at 37oC, 22oC and 4oC. Results showed that the islets stored at 4oC "showed significantly higher insulin secretion" when compared to those stored at 37oC.

"This proved that hypothermic conditions could maintain the islets' ability to secrete insulin, even when exposed to hypoxic damage," said Matsumoto. HMGB1 has been shown to play a role in response to tissue damage, so the researchers also examined HMGB1 expression and the amount of HMGB1 released from each group of islets. They demonstrated that the islets at 37oC up-regulated HMGB1 mRNA, although this was prevented by low temperature conditions. Conversely, the amount of released HMGB1 was "significantly decreased in the cells at 4oC."

The researchers concluded that correspondingly low temperature conditions can prevent hypoxic islet cell damage and that low levels of HMGB1 released from islets might reduce inflammatory responses after transplantation.

"Maintaining low temperature conditions during islet isolation should improve the efficacy of islet isolation in a clinical setting," said the researchers.

Altered oxygen metabolism associated with iPS cells derived from schizophrenic patient

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post