The Neuro clinician-scientists to further research on HIV/AIDS, Parkinson's

Published on November 28, 2012 at 4:32 AM · No Comments

Clinician-scientists take a unique, integrated approach that is essential to advancing science and medicine. Problems encountered in the clinic inspire research and new findings from the labs are directly applied to patients' needs. The integrated model is a hallmark of the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, at McGill University and the MUHC and is now being replicated worldwide. Two clinician-scientists at The Neuro have been awarded grants today to further research on Parkinson's disease and HIV/AIDS.

Tag. You're it! Studying how an enzyme relates to Parkinson's disease

When the protein parkin functions properly it acts like a quality control officer, tagging other proteins that no longer work correctly for destruction. When there are mutations in the gene for parkin, this process no longer occurs efficiently, which causes cell death and leads to a familial form of Parkinson's disease. Dr. Edward Fon, Director, McGill Parkinson Program and clinician-scientist at The Neuro studies what regulates parkin's tagging process and the role a specific enzyme that removes tags may have in this process. Learning more about how this process is regulated could lead to new therapies for Parkinson's disease. Today, Dr. Fon receives the Porridge for Parkinson's (Toronto) Pilot Project Grant of $45,000 from Parkinson Society Canada's National Research Program.

Addressing complex issues related to aging, neurological decline in people living with HIV/AIDS

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