Fully funded Global Fund key to preventing MTCT of HIV

Published on November 30, 2012 at 11:23 AM · No Comments

"HIV is the leading cause of death of women of reproductive age," and without HIV, "maternal mortality worldwide would be 20 percent lower," Lucy Chesire, executive director and secretary to the Board of the TB ACTION Group, writes in the Huffington Post's "The Big Push" blog. She says that women "often face barriers accessing HIV treatment and care," adding she recently "was struck with the significant role the Global Fund [to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria] has played in reducing women's barriers to treatment."

Noting December 1 is World AIDS Day, with the theme "Getting to zero: zero new HIV infections," she writes, "[G]etting to zero means fully-funding the spectrum of interventions -- from prevention to counselors, health care workers, access to treatment and education -- that are all vitally important in the fight against HIV and AIDS." Chesire discusses the importance of preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission, describes several programs working to do so, and concludes, "A fully funded Global Fund in 2013 is one of the most important mechanisms to eliminate mother-to-child-transmission: we have the tools, we need the resources to do it" (11/28).


http://www.kaiserhealthnews.orgThis article was reprinted from kaiserhealthnews.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

 

Posted in: Child Health News | Women's Health News | Disease/Infection News

Tags: , , , , , ,

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post
You might also like... ×
Johns Hopkins' new HIV/AIDS degree program to draw plenty of interest from prospective students