Crofelemer receives FDA approval for treatment of HIV associated diarrhea

Published on January 2, 2013 at 7:44 AM · No Comments

This Will be the First NCE (New Chemical Entity) Launch by an Indian Company Across Multiple Geographies

Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Limited announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has provided Marketing approval to its partner in US, Salix Pharmaceuticals Limited, for Crofelemer 125 mg delayed-release tablets for the symptomatic relief of non-infectious diarrhea in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on anti-retroviral therapy (ART).

"The USFDA approval of Crofelemer for HIV associated diarrhea will pave the wave to launch Crofelemer across our territories. This is a significant approval milestone and will enable the first NCE launch by Glenmark across emerging markets. Most importantly, this is a significant step forward in addressing the unmet medical need of people with HIV/AIDS on ART who experience non-infectious diarrhea, which often can lead to reduced treatment compliance. This will also help us accelerate filing across countries and also propel our development in additional diarrhea indications including the acute indications," said Glenn Saldanha , Chairman & MD, Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Limited.

He added, "Crofelemer, a locally-acting, minimally-absorbed drug is believed to act by blocking chloride secretion and thus reducing the accompanying high volume water loss seen in HIV associated diarrhea. It is this secretion that is believed to lead to diarrhea with the associated symptoms of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, abdominal cramping, urgency and increased frequency. Crofelemer is believed to improve HIV associated diarrhea via dual mechanisms of action with inhibition of both CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Protein) and CaCC (calcium-activated chloride channel) resulting in reduced chloride ion secretion into the GI lumen."

Data supports the use of Crofelemer as an orally administered, anti-secretory anti-diarrheal agent that may provide relief to patients through the inhibition of chloride secretion into the gut. In addition, the Phase 3 study showed that Crofelemer did not influence the efficacy or safety of the patients HIV medications. The FDA approval of Crofelemer is based on a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled (one month) and placebo-free (five month), multi-center study of 374 HIV-positive patients on ART, with a history of diarrhea for one month or more. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients experiencing less than or equal to two watery bowel movements per week, during at least two of the four weeks of the placebo-controlled phase of the study. Patients who received concomitant anti-diarrheal medications or opiates were counted as clinical non-responders.

Data demonstrated that a significantly larger proportion of patients taking Crofelemer 125 mg twice daily experienced clinical response compared with patients in the placebo group. In addition, statistically significant reductions from baseline to the end of the double-blind period also were observed for the number of watery bowel movements per day, and daily stool consistency score, among patients taking Crofelemer compared with placebo. Further, the Crofelemer treatment effect for clinical response (125 mg twice daily vs. placebo) was similar in subgroup analyses based on duration of diarrhea, baseline number of daily watery bowel movements, use of protease inhibitors (PI), and CD4 cell count. The most common adverse reactions in the study were respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, cough, flatulence, and increased bilirubin.

Source:

Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd

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