Antibodies essential for dendritic cell maturation

Published on January 23, 2013 at 12:43 AM · 1 Comment

Dendritic cells, or DCs for short, perform a vital role for the immune system: They engulf pathogens, break them down into their component parts, and then display the pieces on their surface. This in turn signals other immune cells capable of recognizing these pieces to help kick-start their own default program for fighting off the invaders. In order to do their job, the DCs are dependent upon the support from a class of immune system molecules, which have never before been associated with dendritic cells: antibodies, best known for their role in vaccinations and diagnostics. Now, scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) and the Hannover Medical School (MHH) were able to show that antibodies are essential for dendritic cell maturation. The researchers' findings have been published in the renowned scientific journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The human immune system is made up of some half a dozen different cell types that are all working in tandem. Team work is key since each cell type has a single unique job to perform, which is central to its ability to help defend the body against invaders and ward off disease. If one of these players is taken out of commission, the entire system is thrown out of whack.

This is precisely what Dr. Siegfried Weiss, head of HZI Department of Molecular Immunology, and his team of researchers observed when they looked at immunodeficient mice. "Our 'RAG' mice are lacking adaptive, or acquired immunity," explains Weiss. "Basically, what this means is they are missing their antibody-producing B cells, among others."

The dendritic cells belong to a different branch of the immune system - innate immunity, which, although far less pliable, is capable of a fairly rapid response. Which is why these cells should not be affected by a defect in acquired immunity. Still, the scientists noticed that DCs obtained from this particular murine strain were not working properly - their maturation process was faulty and instead of breaking down a pathogen into small pieces, they ended up destroying the pathogen altogether. "The broken down pieces are called antigens. Presenting antigen is the dendritic cells' main job," explains Dr. Natalia Zietara, one of the scientists who worked on this study. "In fact, it is one of the most important points of intersection between the immune system's innate and acquired branches. If it goes missing, any subsequent immune responses don't ever get triggered," adds her colleague, Dr. Marcin Lyszkiewicz. The cells' normally highly precise interplay comes to a standstill and the acquired immune response becomes largely ineffective at a targeted defense against invading pathogens.

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Comments
  1. Liz Reid Liz Reid uk says:

    Ifv dendritic cells form part of the innate immune response and are required for antigen processing and presentation - prior to a T or B cell response where are these antibodies derived from?

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