Joint initiative aims to eradicate health disparities among communities of color in the U.S.

Published on December 20, 2013 at 6:28 AM · No Comments

The world's first and largest group medical practice and one of the nation's premier volunteer service organizations of professional African American women are joining forces to eradicate health disparities among communities of color in the United States. Mayo Clinic and The Links, Incorporated have established a formal collaboration that aims to develop a more diverse health care workforce. The joint initiative ranges from raising health awareness in the African American community to facilitating scientific research -- with a special focus on cardiovascular disease, cancer, organ transplantation and obesity. The collaboration stems from one patient's experience.

Ginger Wilson, a Chicago lawyer and businesswoman, had been experiencing breathing problems -- wheezing, shortness of breath -- as well as weight loss, inflammation and digestive issues.

"After 18 months, I had been diagnosed with asthma, an intestinal bug, an ulcer, rosacea and more," she says. "I received treatment for the individual symptoms, but never one diagnosis for all the symptoms."

One day, while on an outing, Wilson found she couldn't hike more than a few hundred yards. A friend, who was a doctor in training at Mayo Clinic, asked if she'd been checked for carcinoid syndrome, a condition caused by secretions from a slow-growing tumor. Wilson traveled to Mayo Clinic for evaluation, where the diagnosis was confirmed and she underwent treatment. Seven surgeries later, she is back to being active in her Chicago community and owns the first African American female legal staffing firm.

Wilson shared her experience with her friends at Mayo and The Links, Incorporated. Conversations occurred, connections were made and pilot projects developed. To date, educational forums have been held with Mayo Clinic physicians and Links chapters in Chicago and Atlanta. Public service announcements have been produced, and research findings from a collaborative survey were presented at the National Medical Association and other scientific venues. The message: "Listen to your body, be proactive with your health."

"Wilson's experience is a microcosm of what we hope will happen from this collaboration," says Monica Parker, M.D., Emory Health System physician and director of the Health and Human Services facet of The Links, Incorporated. "A strong personal relationship, a sharing of health care information, a level of trust, and an optimal outcome based on quality research-based medicine is our hope for everyone with health care needs."

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post