Subset of TH17 cells linked to inflammation in Crohn’s disease patients, find TSRI scientists

Published on January 9, 2014 at 4:13 AM · 1 Comment

Two-thirds to three-quarters of the estimated 700,000 Americans living with Crohn’s disease, an autoimmune condition that can disrupt the entire gastrointestinal tract, will require surgery at some point during their life. Patients and physicians often turn to this surgical intervention after a patient develops resistance to current treatments, such as steroids.

Now scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a normally small subset of immune cells that may play a major role in the development of Crohn’s disease generally and in disease-associated steroid resistance specifically.

The study, published this week in an advance, online edition of the Journal of Experimental Medicine, focused on Th17 cells, part of a family of white blood cells that have been implicated in numerous autoimmune diseases, including Crohn’s disease.

In the new study, the researchers found that a subset of TH17 cells in humans expresses the multidrug transporter MDR1 and that these cells are linked to inflammation in Crohn’s patients. MDR1—a protein famous for promoting drug-resistance in tumors—may also act as a survival and steroid resistance factor in T cells, particularly in harsh environments such as the inflamed gut mucosa of Crohn’s disease patients.

“Our study is the first to identify and characterize this uniquely pro-inflammatory T-cell subset,” said biologist Mark Sundrud, a TSRI assistant professor who led the study. “We were able to sort these cells directly out of damaged tissue resected from Crohn’s patients and found that these pro-inflammatory cells are over-expressing genes that contribute to disease.”

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Comments
  1. Karen Nutritionist Karen Nutritionist Mexico says:

    Let's hope that Doctors are up on their medical research and will stop recommending steroids over-and-over especially if it is not working for the person. When it comes to turning off inflammation take a look at epigenetic factors of outside influences and omit those that may be contributing to an inflammatory process.

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