Courtagen collaborates with CCMC to identify alterations in genes associated with ASD

Published on April 23, 2014 at 8:12 AM · No Comments

Courtagen Life Sciences, Inc., an innovative molecular information company, announced today a collaboration with Connecticut Children's Medical Center to utilize Courtagen's sophisticated Next Generation Sequencing assays to help identify and characterize alterations found in genes associated with ASD.

"Through the use of our new devSEEKTM sequencing panel targeting developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorders, we expect our collaboration to help elucidate the linkages between certain gene alterations and ASD phenotypes beyond what is possible with current testing technologies, such as chromosomal microarrays," said Brian McKernan, CEO of Courtagen. "We are delighted to partner with CCMC on this important genomics initiative, and hope to bring more pieces to the puzzle."

"We are excited to partner with Courtagen on this initiative with the hope of gaining better insight into the role of genetic alterations in autism spectrum disorders. Our study will look at the association between specific genetic changes and phenotypes in children diagnosed with autism in our Autism Spectrum Assessment Program (ASAP) and Autism Neurogenetics Clinic," said Louisa Kalsner, MD, Pediatric Neurologist at Connecticut Children's Medical Center. "We anticipate that through analysis of detailed historical and medical information, alongside results of the sophisticated genetic analysis provided by Courtagen, we will gain a better understanding of which genes play a role in the development of autism in our patients."

Source:

Connecticut Children's Medical Center

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