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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Novo Nordisk gets positive CHMP opinion for expanded use of Tresiba in children with diabetes

Novo Nordisk gets positive CHMP opinion for expanded use of Tresiba in children with diabetes

Novo Nordisk today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has issued a positive opinion for expanded use of Tresiba® (insulin degludec) in children and adolescents aged one to 17 years with diabetes. [More]
Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Investigators have found that young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower brain growth compared to children without diabetes. A new study, published in the December issue of Diabetes, now available ahead of print, suggests that continued exposure to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugars, may be detrimental to the developing brain. [More]
Only few older adults use apps to help manage Type 2 diabetes, says new study

Only few older adults use apps to help manage Type 2 diabetes, says new study

Despite showing interest in web or mobile apps to help manage their Type 2 diabetes, only a small number of older adults actually use them, says a new study from the University of Waterloo. Approximately 2.2 million Canadians are living with Type 2 diabetes, 2 million of whom are age 50 or older. [More]
Roche announces acquisition of Bina Technologies

Roche announces acquisition of Bina Technologies

Roche announced today the acquisition of Bina Technologies, Inc., a privately held company based in Redwood City, California, USA. Bina provides a big data platform for centralized management and processing of next generation sequencing (NGS) data. [More]
Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

With proper monitoring, kidney donation may be safe for individuals with high blood pressure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The study found that while hypertension can have negative effects on the kidneys, older adults with the condition appear to have good kidney health following donation. [More]
Lilly, Adocia team up to develop BioChaperone Lispro insulin for treatment of diabetes

Lilly, Adocia team up to develop BioChaperone Lispro insulin for treatment of diabetes

Eli Lilly and Company and Adocia today announced a worldwide licensing collaboration focused on developing an ultra-rapid insulin, known as BioChaperone Lispro, for treatment in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. [More]
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
LSDF announces $1.2 million in grants to foster advancement of promising health-related technologies

LSDF announces $1.2 million in grants to foster advancement of promising health-related technologies

The Life Sciences Discovery Fund today announced $1.2 million in Proof of Concept grants to Washington-based organizations to foster the advancement of promising health-related technologies to commercial products. Also announced were two commercialization-focused awards, totaling $600,000, through a new funding program requiring external cash matching. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Self-reported moderate to vigorous exercise was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels in a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. [More]
Researchers examine why Mexican-Americans at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes

Researchers examine why Mexican-Americans at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes

While people of Mexican ancestry are nearly twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as people of European heritage, the majority of research in this area has focused on those of European origin. [More]
Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV [More]
Migraine headache may double risk of nervous system condition that causes Bell's palsy

Migraine headache may double risk of nervous system condition that causes Bell's palsy

Migraine headache may double the risk of a nervous system condition that causes facial paralysis, called Bell's palsy, according to a new study published in the December 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

A more effective treatment for tuberculosis (TB) could soon be available as scientists have discovered that Metformin (MET), a drug for treating diabetes, can also be used to boost the efficacy of TB medication without inducing drug resistance. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]
Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

High blood pressure affects more than 70 million Americans and is a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and other renal and cardiovascular diseases. Two University of Houston College of Pharmacy researchers are examining the role of intrinsic antioxidant pathways in mitigating hypertension. [More]
New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

A new study by an international team of researchers shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively know as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, recently published in Genome Medicine, also confirmed that antibiotics could worsen the imbalance in the gut microbes. [More]
Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Nutrition experts are continually debating the nutritional value of carbohydrate-containing foods and whether some are healthier than others. High carbohydrate foods are classified by how much they increase blood sugar; known as glycemic index. In new findings led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, researchers looked at glycemic index' effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and found that low glycemic diets did not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors. [More]
Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

In a study published today by Nature, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center used a microscopic worm (C. elegans) to identify a new path that could lead to drugs to slow aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it--and might even lead to better cosmetics. [More]
Centenary researchers find potential way to stop spread of tumors

Centenary researchers find potential way to stop spread of tumors

By blocking a widespread enzyme, Centenary researchers have shown they can slow down the movement of cells and potentially stop tumours from spreading and growing. [More]