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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Preventing obesity-related inflammation may reverse type 2 diabetes

Preventing obesity-related inflammation may reverse type 2 diabetes

Preventing inflammation in obese fat tissue may hold the key to preventing or even reversing type 2 diabetes, new research has found. [More]
New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

Defective cilia can lead to a host of diseases and conditions in the human body--from rare, inherited bone malformations to blindness, male infertility, kidney disease and obesity. Scientists knew that somehow these tiny cell organelles become deformed and cause these diseases because of a problem related to their assembly, which requires the translocation of vast quantities of the vital cell protein tubulin. [More]
Alzheimer's Association announces new research grants to study potential drug therapies

Alzheimer's Association announces new research grants to study potential drug therapies

Many academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies have identified new Alzheimer's drug therapy candidates, but lack the funding to move them into human testing. At the same time, few funding sources support early-phase clinical drug trials. As a result, too many promising studies stall out early in the discovery process. [More]
Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a non-healing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Low doses of metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, and a gene inhibitor known as BI2536 can successfully halt the growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors, a Purdue University study finds. [More]
Sanford-Burnham researchers use human pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

Sanford-Burnham researchers use human pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

In a new study from Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss. In the United States alone, more than 40 million men and 21 million women are affected by hair loss. [More]
Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Continuous Glucose Monitoring System with Share receives FDA approval

Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Continuous Glucose Monitoring System with Share receives FDA approval

DexCom, Inc., a leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for patients with diabetes, announced today that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for its Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Continuous Glucose Monitoring System with Share. [More]
New study may lead to novel drug target for treating lung cancer

New study may lead to novel drug target for treating lung cancer

A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a key enzyme and its associated metabolic programming may lead to novel drug development to treat lung cancer. [More]
High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. [More]
Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Nearly three-quarters of homeless adults with mental illness in Canada show evidence of cognitive deficits, such as difficulties with problem solving, learning and memory, new research has found. [More]
Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers are flipping conventional thought on its head regarding how to improve the health of sedentary people at risk for diabetes and heart disease in a new study designed to combat a condition popularly called "sitting disease." [More]
Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

For those with diabetes, managing blood sugar is a balancing act -- if blood sugar is too high it raises the risk for nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and heart trouble, and if too low it can lead to a seizure or unconsciousness. [More]
Heptares Therapeutics announces recipients of Malcolm Campbell Memorial Prize for 2015

Heptares Therapeutics announces recipients of Malcolm Campbell Memorial Prize for 2015

Heptares Therapeutics, the clinical-stage GPCR structure-guided drug discovery and development company, is delighted to announce that the Malcolm Campbell Memorial Prize for 2015 has been awarded to Miles Congreve (Vice President of Chemistry), Fiona Marshall (Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder) and Malcolm Weir (Chief Executive Officer and co-founder) for the seminal contributions to GPCR drug discovery made by Heptares Therapeutics since the company was founded in 2007. [More]
UVA's new program uses EpicCare electronic medical record to improve patients' access to specialists

UVA's new program uses EpicCare electronic medical record to improve patients' access to specialists

The University of Virginia Health System is piloting a new program that uses its EpicCare electronic medical record to speed patients' access to specialists. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center has earned the coveted Baby-Friendly designation. This verifies that the hospital has implemented the ten steps to help new mothers successfully breastfeed. [More]
TOSH Program aims to improve oral-systemic health

TOSH Program aims to improve oral-systemic health

Improving oral health is a leading population health goal; however, curricula preparing health professionals have a dearth of oral health content and clinical experiences. Funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Service Administration, New York University College of Nursing's Teaching Oral-Systemic Health Program is working to build interprofessional oral health workforce capacity which addresses a significant public health issue, increases oral health care access, and improves oral-systemic health across the lifespan. [More]
New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with a decrease in the diversity of bacteria in the gut, but a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has linked the same illnesses to an increase in the diversity of viruses. [More]
Commonwealth Fund grant to support BIDMC's work on OurNotes

Commonwealth Fund grant to support BIDMC's work on OurNotes

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has received a $450,000 grant from The Commonwealth Fund to develop OurNotes, an initiative to promote active patient engagement in health and illness that invites patients to contribute to their own electronic medical records. [More]
Heptares Therapeutics, AstraZeneca report significant progress in drug discovery collaboration

Heptares Therapeutics, AstraZeneca report significant progress in drug discovery collaboration

Heptares Therapeutics, the clinical-stage GPCR structure-guided drug discovery and development company, announces significant progress in its drug discovery collaboration with AstraZeneca. [More]