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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Scraped from the gums, teeth and tongue in the form of plaque, the researchers behind Canada's first plaque bank are betting that the bacterial content of plaque will open up a new frontier of medicine. [More]
Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
CiRA, Takeda collaborate to develop clinical applications of iPS cells

CiRA, Takeda collaborate to develop clinical applications of iPS cells

Center for iPS Cell Research Application of Kyoto University and Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited announced today that they will work together to develop clinical applications of induced pluripotent stem cells in areas such as heart failure, diabetes mellitus, neurological disorders and cancer immunotherapy. [More]
High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

You might think that you can get away with eating fatty foods for a few days without it making any significant changes to your body. Think again. After just five days of eating a high-fat diet, the way in which the body's muscle processes nutrients changes, which could lead to long-term problems such as weight gain, obesity, and other health issues, a new study has found. [More]
Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Health apps have the potential to make a broad impact on the health of the general population, argues one expert in The BMJ this week. But another explains that there is not enough evidence to support such claims and suggests that health apps may even be harmful. [More]
Health-related tweets may help predict hospital emergency room visits

Health-related tweets may help predict hospital emergency room visits

Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be "over-sharers," but new research led by the University of Arizona suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals. [More]
Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

A new approach to combatting tuberculosis would take advantage of a complex, natural process called autophagy that the human body uses to recycle nutrients, remove damaged cell components, eliminate invading bacteria, and respond to inflammation. [More]
Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Rooted in malfunctions in the tiny power plants that energize our cells, mitochondrial disorders are notoriously complex and variable, with few effective treatments. Now, novel findings in microscopic worms may hold great promise for children and adults with mitochondrial disorders [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart. According to research recently published online by the American Heart Association, scientists at Forsyth and Boston University have demonstrated that using an oral topical remedy to reduce inflammation associated with periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease, also results in the prevention of vascular inflammation and can lower the risk of heart attack. [More]
Ancient natural compound can protect the heart from hypertrophy

Ancient natural compound can protect the heart from hypertrophy

A natural compound derived from the bark of the magnolia tree, can protect the heart from hypertrophy, a thickening of cardiac muscle often caused by chronic high blood pressure that can lead to heart failure, researchers report in the April 14 issue of the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Intelligent Hospital Association recognizes Ochsner with Best Comprehensive Integration award

Intelligent Hospital Association recognizes Ochsner with Best Comprehensive Integration award

The Intelligent Hospital Association today announced that Ochsner Health System was awarded the Best Comprehensive Integration for 2014. The award is given to a hospital or health system that effectively and seamlessly integrates technologies to provide a comprehensive solution in a health care facility. [More]
Study: Children with type 1 diabetes five times more likely to be admitted to hospital

Study: Children with type 1 diabetes five times more likely to be admitted to hospital

Children living with type 1 diabetes are nearly five times more likely to be admitted to hospital than non-diabetic children, a new study (attached) has found. [More]
Children with type 1 diabetes five times more likely to be admitted to hospital

Children with type 1 diabetes five times more likely to be admitted to hospital

The number of children being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is increasing 3-4% every year and more so in school-aged children. Treating the condition is complex and poor management can often lead to medical emergencies that result in hospitalisation, placing ever greater demands on health services [More]

Eyenuk's EyeArt automated high-throughput diabetic retinopathy screening receives CE Mark

Eyenuk, Inc. announced today that it received CE Marking for its pioneering EyeArt software, a suite of advanced image analysis tools for automated high-throughput screening of diabetic retinopathy. The company plans to launch its product in select leading eye care sites across Europe in the next few months. [More]
CareFusion showcases new medication management technologies at HIMSS annual conference

CareFusion showcases new medication management technologies at HIMSS annual conference

CareFusion, a BD company, today announced it is demonstrating several new medication management technologies at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society annual conference in the Intelligent Health Pavilion and Interoperability Showcase. [More]
New grant to support establishment of Wallenberg Centre of Molecular Medicine at Umeå University

New grant to support establishment of Wallenberg Centre of Molecular Medicine at Umeå University

Wallenberg Centre of Molecular Medicine at Umeå University - a new research centre at Umeå University - is part of a national plan on how Sweden will regain its world-leading position in medical research. Behind the centre stands Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation in cooperation with Umeå University and the County Council of Västerbotten, among others. [More]
Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai Inc. and Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the completion of two Phase 1 registrational clinical trials that Eisai and Arena believe demonstrate bioequivalence of an investigational once-daily extended release formulation of lorcaserin, as compared to the twice-daily immediate release formulation approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and marketed as BELVIQ. [More]
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