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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Religious fasts feasible for diabetic children

Religious fasts feasible for diabetic children

Children with Type 1 diabetes can successfully participate in religious fasts, a study suggests. [More]
Oral wellness can help save money

Oral wellness can help save money

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine recently published a study from United Concordia Dental that shows reduced hospitalizations and health care costs are possible when individuals with certain chronic conditions, or who are pregnant receive and maintain treatment for gum disease. [More]
Researchers find promising technique for type 1 diabetics to restore insulin producing cells

Researchers find promising technique for type 1 diabetics to restore insulin producing cells

A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas into those cells destroyed in type 1 diabetes-insulin-producing beta cells. [More]
New hope for people suffering from obesity and diabetes

New hope for people suffering from obesity and diabetes

White, brown and beige adipocytes, or fat cells, are inherently different. Each of these cell types has different functions and each plays its own role in metabolism. In the human body, white adipose tissue is by far the most prevalent. [More]
OAC, YMCA of Central Florida partner to educate public about obesity, health and wellness

OAC, YMCA of Central Florida partner to educate public about obesity, health and wellness

Today, the Obesity Action Coalition and the YMCA of Central Florida are proud to announce an exciting new partnership aimed at educating the public about obesity, health and wellness and much more. With synergistic missions focused on overall health, the partnership is a proactive step forward to help the more than 93 million Americans impacted by the disease of obesity. [More]
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

The 31-year-old Moore Clinic operated by the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service at the School of Medicine is a historic operation — the second-oldest AIDS clinic in the country. But when Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, looks nowadays at the makeup of Moore's caregiving staff, he worries that he's seeing too much history. [More]
BD reports 5.1% increase in third fiscal quarter revenues

BD reports 5.1% increase in third fiscal quarter revenues

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today reported quarterly revenues of $2.157 billion for the third fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2014, representing an increase of 5.1 percent from the prior-year period, or 4.6 percent on a foreign currency-neutral basis. [More]
ChromaDex to provide Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with NR ingredient for research use

ChromaDex to provide Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with NR ingredient for research use

ChromaDex Corp., an innovative natural products company that provides proprietary ingredients and science-based solutions to the dietary supplement, food and beverage, animal health, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, announced today it has entered into a material transfer agreement (MTA) with Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, the preeminent child health research institute in Australia. [More]
Statin therapy may speed up wound healing following cardiac surgery

Statin therapy may speed up wound healing following cardiac surgery

Statin therapy may help to improve wound healing in patients following cardiac surgery and reduce overall recovery time, especially in patients who are prone to healing complications, according to a review article in the August 2014 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Catheter ablation improves quality of life for adults with atrial fibrillation

Catheter ablation improves quality of life for adults with atrial fibrillation

Adults who undergo a minimally invasive technique to treat atrial fibrillation are significantly less likely to die from a heart attack or heart failure, according to a long-term study by the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center. [More]
EMA CHMP issues positive opinion for label updates to Takeda's Vipidia, Vipdomet and Incresync

EMA CHMP issues positive opinion for label updates to Takeda's Vipidia, Vipdomet and Incresync

Takeda Pharmaceuticals International GmbH today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has issued positive opinions for updates to the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) for Vipidia (alogliptin) and the fixed-dose combination (FDC) therapies Vipdomet (alogliptin and metformin) and Incresync (alogliptin and pioglitazone). [More]
New toolkits help young adults navigate shift from pediatric to adult health care

New toolkits help young adults navigate shift from pediatric to adult health care

For young adults who have been diagnosed with a chronic condition like Type 1 diabetes or growth hormone deficiency, health concerns can add a degree of difficulty to transitions like leaving for college or living alone for the first time. [More]
Microbes living in guts of males and females react differently to diet

Microbes living in guts of males and females react differently to diet

The microbes living in the guts of males and females react differently to diet, even when the diets are identical, according to a study by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and six other institutions published this week in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
GSK announces availability of once-weekly Tanzeum in pharmacies throughout the U.S.

GSK announces availability of once-weekly Tanzeum in pharmacies throughout the U.S.

GSK today announced that once-weekly Tanzeum (albiglutide), a prescription injectable treatment for type 2 diabetes in adults, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, is now available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. [More]
FDA approves EYLEA Injection for treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema

FDA approves EYLEA Injection for treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for the treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema (DME). [More]
Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

In the case of a cough or a sore throat, the doctor can usually diagnose a common cold immediately. However, the diagnosis of hereditary illnesses like cystic fibrosis, which affects the metabolism, or Huntington's disease, which leads to cognitive decline, is much more complex. [More]
Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Achalasia is a rare disease - it affects 1 in 100,000 people - characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. [More]
Healthy lifestyle may help childhood cancer survivors avoid metabolic syndrome

Healthy lifestyle may help childhood cancer survivors avoid metabolic syndrome

A new study has found that following a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors’ risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that children with cancer and adults who had cancer when they were children should receive information about how their lifestyle may influence their long-term health. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate negative impacts of stress

Study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate negative impacts of stress

A new study from UC San Francisco is the first to show that while the impact of life's stressors accumulate overtime and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well. [More]