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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Coffee drinking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events (mainly heart attacks) in young adults (18-45) with mild hypertension, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos, a cardiologist at Hospital of San Daniele del Friuli in Udine, Italy. [More]
Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
UVM-led research team to study benefits of integrating behavioral health care with medical care

UVM-led research team to study benefits of integrating behavioral health care with medical care

A University of Vermont-led research team has received approval for $18.5 million in funding to study whether patients with both medical and behavioral problems do better when their primary care physicians work in combination with behavioral health professionals including psychologists and social workers. [More]
National award presented to seven community health centers for innovation in diabetes care

National award presented to seven community health centers for innovation in diabetes care

BD, Direct Relief, and the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) honored seven of the nation's 1,200 community health centers with the Innovations in Care Award at this week's Community Health Institute and EXPO in Orlando, Florida. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
Despite increased life expectancy, British people suffer from more medical ailments

Despite increased life expectancy, British people suffer from more medical ailments

People in the UK are living longer but are coping with more medical ailments causing illness or disability in their older years, according to a major new international study published in The Lancet today (Thursday 27 August). [More]
Proportion of diabetes patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting rises from 7% to 37% in 40 years

Proportion of diabetes patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting rises from 7% to 37% in 40 years

In the 40 years between 1970-2010, the proportion of patients with diabetes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) escalated from 7% to 37%. The results of a large study from Cleveland Clinic just published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, the official publication of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, documents the five-fold increase in the proportion of patients with diabetes undergoing this procedure between 1970 and 2010. [More]
Researchers find fatty acid deposits in brains of Alzheimer's patients

Researchers find fatty acid deposits in brains of Alzheimer's patients

People with Alzheimer's disease have fat deposits in the brain. For the first time since the disease was described 109 years ago, researchers affiliated with the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered accumulations of fat droplets in the brain of patients who died from the disease and have identified the nature of the fat. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
Research with UWF imaging may change how diabetic eye disease is assessed and treated

Research with UWF imaging may change how diabetic eye disease is assessed and treated

For decades, clinicians have detected and monitored diabetic eye disease with standard retinal photographs that cover about a third of the retina. In recent years, an emerging class of ultrawide field (UWF) cameras has given a substantially larger view of the retina, providing new insight on the presentation and natural history of retinal disease. [More]
Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Damaged tissue, such as pancreas, heart, and neuronal tissue, which is regenerated to treat cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or neurodegenerative diseases. This is one of the ambitious scenarios to which regenerative medicine aspires and that is being announced as one of the great promises of twenty-first century biomedicine for the treatment of a long list of diseases affecting people today. [More]
Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

A meta-analysis has identified the key modifiable factors associated with an increased or decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. [More]
Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Every organism--from a seedling to a president--must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery. [More]
Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that pregnant women in Sweden had inadequate levels of iodine in their diets. Proper iodine nutrition is necessary for neurological development of the fetus. [More]
Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Liver transplantation is currently the only established treatment for patients with end stage liver failure. However, this treatment is limited by the shortage of donors and the conditional integrity and suitability of the available organs. Transplanting donor hepatocytes (liver cells) into the liver as an alternative to liver transplantation also has drawbacks as the rate of survival of primary hepatocytes is limited and often severe complications can result from the transplantation procedure. [More]
Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy has risen by more than six years since 1990 as healthy life expectancy grows; ischemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, and stroke cause the most health loss around the world. [More]
Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD with 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation

Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD with 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation

Based on its recent analysis of the intravenous drug delivery devices market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) with the 2015 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation. The company's BD Intelliport System is the industry's first medication management system designed to overcome long-standing challenges associated with the administration of manual intravenous bolus injections. [More]
Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

What do a prominent physiologist and two-time survivor of pancreatic cancer and a world-renowned researcher whose landmark discoveries on aspirin, drug therapies of proven benefit and therapeutic lifestyle changes that have saved more than 1.1 million lives have in common? They are both passionate about the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risks of dying from heart attacks and strokes, as well as developing diabetes, hypertension and colon cancer. And more importantly, enhancing mental health and fostering healthy muscles, bones and joints in all Americans from childhood to the elderly. [More]
Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Platform therapeutic company Symic Biomedical, Inc. announced today that it has received a $1.5M Phase II SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health to further develop its therapeutic agent to reduce arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failures, a significant unmet clinical need in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
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