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Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.
Coffee increases risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension

Coffee increases risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension

Coffee increases the risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension who are slow caffeine metabolisers, according to results from the HARVEST study presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos from Italy. People who drank more than three cups of coffee per day doubled their risk of prediabetes. [More]
Concordia's subsidiary signs collaboration deal with Orphan Canada for PHOTOFRIN

Concordia's subsidiary signs collaboration deal with Orphan Canada for PHOTOFRIN

Concordia Healthcare Corp., a diverse healthcare company focused on legacy pharmaceutical products, orphan drugs, and medical devices for the diabetic population, today announced that its subsidiary, Pinnacle Biologics, Inc., a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in rare diseases, has signed a collaboration agreement for PHOTOFRIN® with Orphan Canada, a Toronto-based specialty pharmaceutical company that in‐licenses therapies for rare disorders and specialty medicines within Canada. [More]
Thrombus aspiration for acute myocardial infarction does not reduce mortality

Thrombus aspiration for acute myocardial infarction does not reduce mortality

Thrombus aspiration for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) does not reduce mortality or other clinical endpoints long term, according to the awaited one-year follow-up results from the Thrombus Aspiration in ST- Elevation myocardial infarction in Scandinavia (TASTE) trial. [More]
Kids, adolescents are at increased risk of developing diabetes if exposed to antipsychotics

Kids, adolescents are at increased risk of developing diabetes if exposed to antipsychotics

A study published in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that children and adolescents diagnosed with a psychiatric diagnosis had an increased risk of developing diabetes if they were exposed to antipsychotics. [More]
Research report: Fatty Liver Disease Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2014

Research report: Fatty Liver Disease Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2014

Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report: Fatty Liver Disease Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2014 [More]
Quality of U.S. diet shows improvement, but expands gap in overall diet quality between rich and poor

Quality of U.S. diet shows improvement, but expands gap in overall diet quality between rich and poor

The quality of the U.S. diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but the gap in overall diet quality widened between the rich and the poor. [More]
Permanent atrial fibrillation twins risk of stroke than paroxysmal AF

Permanent atrial fibrillation twins risk of stroke than paroxysmal AF

Permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) doubles the risk of stroke compared to paroxysmal AF, according to research in more than 6 000 patients presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Thomas Vanassche from Belgium. The findings suggest that a simple clinical assessment of the type of AF can help doctors to better estimate stroke risk. [More]
Low-carb trumps low-fat for weight loss and cardiovascular risk

Low-carb trumps low-fat for weight loss and cardiovascular risk

A low-carbohydrate diet is more effective for weight loss and reducing cardiovascular risk factors than a low-fat diet, according to an article being published in Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Researchers see benefit from behavioral weight loss program designed to curb food addiction

Researchers see benefit from behavioral weight loss program designed to curb food addiction

It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and at Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

Researchers report that the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection has fallen significantly in the USA in the past decade but describe a “concerning trend” whereby the baseline health status of those with serious pneumococcal disease has worsened. [More]
Blood pressure self-management suitable for high-risk patients

Blood pressure self-management suitable for high-risk patients

Patients with hypertension and high cardiovascular risk can successfully monitor and titrate their own antihypertensive medication, shows research published in JAMA. [More]
'Good' cholesterol turns 'bad' by sugar-derived substance

'Good' cholesterol turns 'bad' by sugar-derived substance

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that 'good' cholesterol is turned 'bad' by a sugar-derived substance. [More]
Measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help avoid surgery

Measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help avoid surgery

A method for measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help more than one fifth of them avoid stents or surgery, according to a British study presented at the ESC Congress 2014 today. [More]
Study: Resistant hypertension increases risk of stroke in female and elderly patients

Study: Resistant hypertension increases risk of stroke in female and elderly patients

Resistant hypertension increases the risk of stroke by 35% in women and 20% in elderly Taiwanese patients, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Kuo-Yang Wang from Taiwan. [More]
Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging, according to a review of the latest research on senior athletes (ages 65 and up) appearing in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

At bariatric facilities like Dr. Feiz and Associates, the life-changing benefits of bariatric surgery, including reduced risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and endocrine disorders are well established. [More]
New study reveals psychosocial health benefits for older adults who volunteer

New study reveals psychosocial health benefits for older adults who volunteer

Older adults who stay active by volunteering are getting more out of it than just an altruistic feeling - they are receiving a health boost! [More]
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

Sudden unexpected death (SUD) results from a malfunction of the heart and causes a rapid loss of blood flow through the body, leading to death. It is a very rapid process and may have few or no known warning signs. The overall survival rate for out-of-hospital arrest is only 5-10%. SUD is responsible for upwards of 450,000 people in the United States each year, with North Carolina experiencing an average of 32 SUD-related deaths each day. [More]