Oral vitamin D spray offers better protection from colds and flu than tablets

More than three million people across the UK could fend off acute respiratory infections such as colds or flu every year if everyone took Vitamin D supplements, according to a new study published by the British Medical Journal.

Professor Adrian Martineau, who conducted the research said:

Assuming a UK population of 65 million, and that 70% have at least one acute respiratory infection each year, then daily or weekly vitamin D supplements will mean 3.25 million fewer people would get at least one acute respiratory infection a year.

Multiple trials have found that oral vitamin sprays elevate serum vitamin D levels on average 2.5 times more effectively than traditional tablets and capsules.

Researchers at Cardiff University, when testing BetterYou’s DLux vitamin D oral sprays, found that absorption within the mouth was far superior to the more traditional digestive route of tablets and capsules benefiting from very absorbent tissue and the close proximity of a rich vein system.

Dr Charles Heard, who lead the Cardiff University absorption trial, explains:

The ultra-fast uptake is due to the very absorbent tissue within the mouth and the close proximity of a rich vein network. In some cases, it is close to that of IV or intramuscular injections.

A pilot study by BetterYou and City Assays (part of Sandwell and Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust) successfully demonstrated how a high dose oral spray of vitamin D can dramatically increase vitamin D levels and resolve insufficiency/deficiency (below 50 nmol/L or 20 ng/ml) to an optimal level (100-150 nmol/L or 40-60 ng/ml).

Public Health England announced last year that everyone should take vitamin D supplements in autumn and winter for the sake of healthy bones and muscles.

BetterYou’s range of DLux oral vitamin D sprays come in different strengths for people of all ages. The key benefits of an oral spray include convenience and guaranteed absorption which traditional tablets, capsules and drops simply can’t. An oral spray doesn’t require water to take and does not need to be taken with food.

Posted in: Disease/Infection News | Healthcare News | Pharmaceutical News

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Vitamin D supplements protect against acute respiratory infections, study finds