WITec alpha300 Ri - Inverted Raman Imaging Microscope

WITec's alpha300 Ri inverted confocal Raman imaging microscope facilitates 3D chemical characterization from a new angle.

The inverted beam path of the alpha300 Ri microscope preserves all the functionality of WITec’s alpha300 R Raman microscope series while adding even greater flexibility in sample access and handling.

The ability to survey and analyze samples from below is a distinct advantage when investigating aqueous solutions and oversized samples. Researchers in the fields of pharmaceutics, geoscience, life science, medical devices and many more will benefit from the flexibility and convenience provided by the alpha300 Ri.

Key features of the alpha300 Ri:

  • An inverted beam path enables liquid samples to be placed on the fixed plane of the stage for both rapid and repeatable measurements
  • The motorized sample stage allows for the integration of environmental enclosures and other accessories
  • Raman microscopy is non-destructive and doesn't require staining or other specialiized sample preparation
  • Large samples that would be difficult to analyze under a traditional microscope objective turret can be accommodated by the alpha300 Ri’s sample stage
  • Features all the exclusive and proven imaging and spectroscopy capabilities of the WITec alpha300 R range
  • Can be used with other microscopy methods such as fluorescence, phase-contrast, and differential interference contrast (DIC)
Correlative Raman - fluorescence microscopy image of eukaryotic cells. Nuclei were stained with DAPI (blue). Endoplasmic reticulum (red) and nucleoli (green) were identified by their Raman signals.

Correlative Raman - fluorescence microscopy image of eukaryotic cells. Nuclei were stained with DAPI (blue). Endoplasmic reticulum (red) and nucleoli (green) were identified by their Raman signals. Image Credit: WITec GmbH

3D confocal Raman imaging measurement of banana pulp: Starch grains (green); cell wall components (red).

3D confocal Raman imaging measurement of banana pulp: Starch grains (green); cell wall components (red). Image Credit: WITec GmbH