Roseola News and Research

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Roseola is a viral infection affecting young children. It causes a skin rash of a pinkish color after the child has been racked by high fever for a couple of days. The multiple rash spots tend to turn white when touched. Individual rashes may have lighter rings of pink around them like halos. The spots start out on the trunk of the body, then spread to the neck, face, arms, and legs. It is a fairly common disease in children between 3 months to 4 years of age.
Researchers find genes from 'fossil' virus in human DNA to be active

Researchers find genes from 'fossil' virus in human DNA to be active

Ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 may play key role in brain diseases like multiple sclerosis

Ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 may play key role in brain diseases like multiple sclerosis

HHV-6A human herpesvirus infects uterus lining of women with unexplained infertility

HHV-6A human herpesvirus infects uterus lining of women with unexplained infertility

Loyola pediatrician reveals signs and symptoms of childhood rashes

Loyola pediatrician reveals signs and symptoms of childhood rashes

Study: Apoptosis triggers alternate replication pathway in HHV

Study: Apoptosis triggers alternate replication pathway in HHV

Roseola virus behind one-third of febrile seizures in young children

Roseola virus behind one-third of febrile seizures in young children

Study strengthens link between HHV-6B and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

Study strengthens link between HHV-6B and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

Roseola virus accounts for one third of febrile status epilepticus cases

Roseola virus accounts for one third of febrile status epilepticus cases

Raltegravir could be valid target against all Herpesviridae

Raltegravir could be valid target against all Herpesviridae

USF study: HHV-6 causes permanent infection by inserting its DNA into human chromosomes

USF study: HHV-6 causes permanent infection by inserting its DNA into human chromosomes

Herpes drug Acyclovir could help control HIV

Herpes drug Acyclovir could help control HIV

Human herpes virus 6 weaves itself into the DNA transferred from parents to babies

Human herpes virus 6 weaves itself into the DNA transferred from parents to babies

Herpesviruses are everywhere!

Herpesviruses are everywhere!