Tularemia News and Research

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Tularemia is a disease of animals and humans caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. Rabbits, hares, and rodents are especially susceptible and often die in large numbers during outbreaks. Humans can become infected through several routes, including tick and deer fly bites, skin contact with infected animals, ingestion of contaminated water, or inhalation of contaminated dusts or aerosols. In addition, humans could be exposed as a result of bioterrorism. Symptoms vary depending upon the route of infection. Although tularemia can be life-threatening, most infections can be treated successfully with antibiotics. Steps to prevent tularemia include use of insect repellent, wearing gloves when handling sick or dead animals, and not mowing over dead animals. In the United States, naturally occurring infections have been reported from all States except Hawaii.
Researchers predict Tularemia outbreaks as climate changes

Researchers predict Tularemia outbreaks as climate changes

'Scissors' component of CRISPR/Cas9 sometimes gets stuck

'Scissors' component of CRISPR/Cas9 sometimes gets stuck

New study launched in Burkina Faso to test typhoid conjugate vaccine

New study launched in Burkina Faso to test typhoid conjugate vaccine

Transmission of F. tularensis unlikely to happen through the food chain

Transmission of F. tularensis unlikely to happen through the food chain

NIH researchers identify natural lipid that acts as potent anti-inflammatory

NIH researchers identify natural lipid that acts as potent anti-inflammatory

NIH study unravels how tularemia bacteria trick host cells to cause disease

NIH study unravels how tularemia bacteria trick host cells to cause disease

Ticks and mosquitoes a “growing health problem” says CDC

Ticks and mosquitoes a “growing health problem” says CDC

First African child vaccinated with new typhoid conjugate vaccine

First African child vaccinated with new typhoid conjugate vaccine

Serological study shows prevalence of tularemia pathogens in Austrian hunting dogs

Serological study shows prevalence of tularemia pathogens in Austrian hunting dogs

Molecular map shows novel way to stop dangerous bioweapon

Molecular map shows novel way to stop dangerous bioweapon

Distinguishing biothreat look-alikes could aid biological surveillance

Distinguishing biothreat look-alikes could aid biological surveillance

Researchers decode how ingenious tick immune system fights myriad of microbes

Researchers decode how ingenious tick immune system fights myriad of microbes

Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

New model identifies climate change as significant factor for expansion of lone star ticks in Kansas

New model identifies climate change as significant factor for expansion of lone star ticks in Kansas

New UNC School of Medicine study shows how some bacteria can spread throughout the body

New UNC School of Medicine study shows how some bacteria can spread throughout the body

SLU VTEU awarded $5.8 million NIH contract to support 'omics' research initiative

SLU VTEU awarded $5.8 million NIH contract to support 'omics' research initiative

Infections with Lone star ticks appear to be surging but deaths are not, new study reveals

Infections with Lone star ticks appear to be surging but deaths are not, new study reveals

Online course offered in October on zoonotic disease

Online course offered in October on zoonotic disease

ESA supports implementation of national strategy to control tick-borne diseases

ESA supports implementation of national strategy to control tick-borne diseases

New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks

New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks