Basal Cell Carcinoma News and Research

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Basal cell cancer begins in the lowest layer of the epidermis, the basal cell layer. About 8 out of 10 skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas. They usually begin on areas exposed to the sun, such as the head and neck. Basal cell carcinoma was once found mostly in middle-aged or older people. But now it is also being seen in younger people. This may be because people are spending more time in the sun without protecting their skin.

Basal cell carcinoma tends to grow slowly. It is very rare for a basal cell cancer to spread to distant parts of the body (metastasize). But if it is not treated, it can grow into nearby areas and spread into the bone or other tissues beneath the skin.

After treatment, basal cell carcinoma can come back (recur) in the same place on the skin. New basal cell cancers can also start in other places on the skin. As many as half of the people who have one basal cell cancer will get a new skin cancer within 5 years.
Veterans with exposure to Agent Orange may be at higher risk for skin cancer

Veterans with exposure to Agent Orange may be at higher risk for skin cancer

GSK receives FDA approval for combination of Mekinist with Tafinlar for treatment of melanoma

GSK receives FDA approval for combination of Mekinist with Tafinlar for treatment of melanoma

Blaze Bioscience to initiate first Phase 1 clinical study of BLZ-100 in patients with skin tumors

Blaze Bioscience to initiate first Phase 1 clinical study of BLZ-100 in patients with skin tumors

Celgene subsidiary presents REVLIMID study results on lymphoma at ASH annual meeting

Celgene subsidiary presents REVLIMID study results on lymphoma at ASH annual meeting

Vismodegib drug does not offer added benefits for patients with BCC

Vismodegib drug does not offer added benefits for patients with BCC

Online skin cancer detection training course improves physicians skill levels

Online skin cancer detection training course improves physicians skill levels

Skin cancer drug shows periocular promise

Skin cancer drug shows periocular promise

Research: Sunscreen provides 100% protection against skin cancer

Research: Sunscreen provides 100% protection against skin cancer

New prototype technique improves diagnosis of cancer tissue during operation

New prototype technique improves diagnosis of cancer tissue during operation

Bioactive compounds in coffee may prevent prostate cancer recurrence, delay progression

Bioactive compounds in coffee may prevent prostate cancer recurrence, delay progression

Celgene to discontinue treatment with REVLIMID in phase III ORIGIN trial

Celgene to discontinue treatment with REVLIMID in phase III ORIGIN trial

Phase III study: REVLIMID meets primary endpoint in patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma

Phase III study: REVLIMID meets primary endpoint in patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma

University of Sheffield researchers show how human skin constantly regrows

University of Sheffield researchers show how human skin constantly regrows

Researchers develop multicolor fluorescence labeling method to identify tumor specific miRNAs

Researchers develop multicolor fluorescence labeling method to identify tumor specific miRNAs

New skin cancer drug successfully tested in humans

New skin cancer drug successfully tested in humans

TSRI scientists find dissimilar genes that keep very similar shapes

TSRI scientists find dissimilar genes that keep very similar shapes

UCSF study focuses on vexing problems of handling skin cancers among elderly patients

UCSF study focuses on vexing problems of handling skin cancers among elderly patients

Experts and patients share tips on preventing skin cancer

Experts and patients share tips on preventing skin cancer

Individuals with MEN1 are at increased risk of developing neuroendocrine tumors

Individuals with MEN1 are at increased risk of developing neuroendocrine tumors

Blocking aPKC activity can stop growth of transplanted skin tumors resistant to vismodegib

Blocking aPKC activity can stop growth of transplanted skin tumors resistant to vismodegib