Cervical Cancer News and Research

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Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. Also known as the womb, the uterus is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The cervix connects the upper part of the uterus to the vagina (birth canal).

Cervical cancer is highly preventable in most Western countries because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent HPV infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.
IHV researchers receive $7.5 million to control cancer among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

IHV researchers receive $7.5 million to control cancer among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Sexual side effects of cancer treatment discussed less frequently with female patients

Sexual side effects of cancer treatment discussed less frequently with female patients

Breakthrough discovery is a 'major step forward' in understanding cervical cancer

Breakthrough discovery is a 'major step forward' in understanding cervical cancer

Research project on female schistosomiasis receives record-high funding

Research project on female schistosomiasis receives record-high funding

‘Separate and unequal’: Critics say Newsom’s pricey Medicaid reforms leave most patients behind

‘Separate and unequal’: Critics say Newsom’s pricey Medicaid reforms leave most patients behind

Miami’s Little Haiti joins global effort to end cervical cancer

Miami’s Little Haiti joins global effort to end cervical cancer

Black women more likely to die from breast cancer despite lower incidence, ACS report finds

Black women more likely to die from breast cancer despite lower incidence, ACS report finds

Disparities in cancer screening rates associated with U.S. county's social vulnerability index

Disparities in cancer screening rates associated with U.S. county's social vulnerability index

New abortion laws jeopardize cancer treatment for pregnant patients

New abortion laws jeopardize cancer treatment for pregnant patients

Final results of the PATHFINDER study by GRAIL on multi-cancer early detection tests announced

Final results of the PATHFINDER study by GRAIL on multi-cancer early detection tests announced

Rutgers study uncovers predictors of anal high-risk HPV infection

Rutgers study uncovers predictors of anal high-risk HPV infection

Cost concerns lead to delay in Nigeria’s HPV vaccination plan

Cost concerns lead to delay in Nigeria’s HPV vaccination plan

HPV vaccine together with surgical treatment for cervical lesions may reduce recurrence of preinvasive disease

HPV vaccine together with surgical treatment for cervical lesions may reduce recurrence of preinvasive disease

Nonfungible tokens may help overcome the ethical challenges for secondary use of biospecimens

Nonfungible tokens may help overcome the ethical challenges for secondary use of biospecimens

The role of cellular or cytokine response and vaginal microbiome dysbiosis in the clearance, persistence, and recurrence of HPV infection

The role of cellular or cytokine response and vaginal microbiome dysbiosis in the clearance, persistence, and recurrence of HPV infection

Treatment of precancerous anal growths in HIV patients decreases the progression to anal cancer

Treatment of precancerous anal growths in HIV patients decreases the progression to anal cancer

Nomogram helps predict anal cancer risk in HIV patients

Nomogram helps predict anal cancer risk in HIV patients

Scientists create new fluorophores that could help fight cancer

Scientists create new fluorophores that could help fight cancer

Treating anal precancerous growths reduces risk of anal cancer by more than half in HIV patients

Treating anal precancerous growths reduces risk of anal cancer by more than half in HIV patients

Preventive care may be free, but follow-up diagnostic tests can bring big bills

Preventive care may be free, but follow-up diagnostic tests can bring big bills

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