Leishmaniasis News and Research

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Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease transmitted by the bite of infected sand flies. It is found in nearly 88 countries, from rain forests in Central and South America to deserts in the Middle East and west Asia. Some cases of the disease have also appeared in Mexico and Texas.

Leishmaniasis takes several different forms, including the most common cutaneous leishmaniasis, which causes skin sores, and the more severe visceral leishmaniasis, which affects internal organs such as the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are 1.5 million new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and 500,000 new cases of visceral leishmaniasis in the world each year.

Further Reading

Researchers identify genes that could help predict treatment outcomes for parasitic disease

Researchers identify genes that could help predict treatment outcomes for parasitic disease

Clinical trial begins to find better treatment for chronic cases of PKDL in Africa

Clinical trial begins to find better treatment for chronic cases of PKDL in Africa

Researchers report increasing incidence of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil

Researchers report increasing incidence of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil

INRS professors develop innovative strategy to identify leishmanicidal molecules

INRS professors develop innovative strategy to identify leishmanicidal molecules

Researchers discover how chronic infections can outsmart the immune system

Researchers discover how chronic infections can outsmart the immune system

Researchers create vaccine that protects against malaria in mouse models

Researchers create vaccine that protects against malaria in mouse models

Clinical study to find improved treatment for visceral leishmaniasis starts in eastern Africa

Clinical study to find improved treatment for visceral leishmaniasis starts in eastern Africa

Leishmania genome study reveals the parasites adaptation to the environment

Leishmania genome study reveals the parasites adaptation to the environment

Leishmania adaptation to environmental changes results from frequent chromosomal amplifications

Leishmania adaptation to environmental changes results from frequent chromosomal amplifications

UTEP researchers one step closer to developing effective vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis

UTEP researchers one step closer to developing effective vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis

GHIT Fund announces US$16.7 million to support development of new drugs, vaccines and diagnostics

GHIT Fund announces US$16.7 million to support development of new drugs, vaccines and diagnostics

Researchers uncover promising targets for development of drugs against leishmaniasis

Researchers uncover promising targets for development of drugs against leishmaniasis

Immune response to parasite varies depending on what time infection occurs, study shows

Immune response to parasite varies depending on what time infection occurs, study shows

LSTM researchers receive £6.4 million to develop evidence-based solutions for vector control

LSTM researchers receive £6.4 million to develop evidence-based solutions for vector control

Scientists discover role of skin in spreading leishmaniasis

Scientists discover role of skin in spreading leishmaniasis

Study identifies potent molecular mechanism for insecticide resistance in sandfly species

Study identifies potent molecular mechanism for insecticide resistance in sandfly species

WHO marching toward extraordinary progress against neglected tropical diseases, report reveals

WHO marching toward extraordinary progress against neglected tropical diseases, report reveals

GHIT Fund invests in phase 3 clinical trial for pediatric formulation of ‘snail fever’ drug

GHIT Fund invests in phase 3 clinical trial for pediatric formulation of ‘snail fever’ drug

Researchers discover promising target for treatment of leishmaniasis

Researchers discover promising target for treatment of leishmaniasis

New study proves that 'super-boosting' approach may help treat children co-infected with TB and HIV

New study proves that 'super-boosting' approach may help treat children co-infected with TB and HIV