1. Brett Whaley Brett Whaley United States says:

    A recent study from Washington University of St Louis SOM took bone marrow aspirations and found that long term immunity in the previously infected is highly likely. Antibodies do not stick around forever. The task eventually goes to long term memory cells in the bone marrow that produce resistance in the future when re-exposed to the pathogen.

    We know through common sense that the previously infected have at least approximately 18 months of immunity as they are extremely rarely reinfected. Those that are have minimal issues.

    We do NOT know the same for the vaccinated as the genetic therapies have only been in mass circulation for 6-7 months.

    It is also interesting that we in the medical community ignore the worldwide studies on therapies such as Ivermectin that have shown great success in TREATMENT.

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