Support for Stillbirth and Miscarriage

The loss of a baby through stillbirth or miscarriage is an emotionally traumatic event that no parent ever forgets. Parents who were expecting and anticipating a new life but instead find themselves grieving a death, find it immensely difficult to accept the loss of their baby as a reality.

This can be especially difficult when a mother has given birth to her baby, which was stillborn. She will still experience all of the usual post-natal reactions, which can be particularly distressing when trying to process the death of the baby.

Fathers often also have a lot to cope with. As well as grieving the loss of their child, their concern for the mother makes this an extremely difficult time. The focus among friends and family is often the mother, meaning that fathers are generally asked how the mother is, rather than how they are coping or feeling as fathers. Fathers also need support and ways to express grief after losing their baby.

Many people experience anxiety and guilt in the days following their loss and some individuals go on to develop depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These individuals may find it helpful to discuss their feelings with their doctor or midwife or with other individuals who have also lost their baby.

Support Groups

In the UK, there are a number of support groups available to help people who have lost their baby through miscarriage or stillbirth. A stillbirth and neonatal death charity called “Sands” provides support for anyone who has experienced this loss and runs a telephone helpline people can use to access information and literature about support. The charity also funds research investigating the causes of stillbirth.

There is also a number of other support groups in the UK that provide help for bereaved parents and their family members. The groups are usually run by people who specialise in baby loss, parents who have lost their babies and specialist midwives. Support groups are also available for women who have lost their baby due to a specific cause such as pre-eclampsia, intrahepatic cholestasis (ICP) or group B streptococcus. Examples include “ICP support”, “Action on Pre-eclampsia” and “Group B Strep Support.”

Further Reading

Last Updated: Feb 27, 2019

Sally Robertson

Written by

Sally Robertson

Sally has a Bachelor's Degree in Biomedical Sciences (B.Sc.). She is a specialist in reviewing and summarising the latest findings across all areas of medicine covered in major, high-impact, world-leading international medical journals, international press conferences and bulletins from governmental agencies and regulatory bodies. At News-Medical, Sally generates daily news features, life science articles and interview coverage.

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Robertson, Sally. (2019, February 27). Support for Stillbirth and Miscarriage. News-Medical. Retrieved on October 20, 2019 from https://www.news-medical.net/health/Support-for-Stillbirth-and-Miscarriage.aspx.

  • MLA

    Robertson, Sally. "Support for Stillbirth and Miscarriage". News-Medical. 20 October 2019. <https://www.news-medical.net/health/Support-for-Stillbirth-and-Miscarriage.aspx>.

  • Chicago

    Robertson, Sally. "Support for Stillbirth and Miscarriage". News-Medical. https://www.news-medical.net/health/Support-for-Stillbirth-and-Miscarriage.aspx. (accessed October 20, 2019).

  • Harvard

    Robertson, Sally. 2019. Support for Stillbirth and Miscarriage. News-Medical, viewed 20 October 2019, https://www.news-medical.net/health/Support-for-Stillbirth-and-Miscarriage.aspx.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post