METTLER TOLEDO offers free e-Learning course and certificate on Routine Balance Testing

With routine use, balances may become less-than-accurate, making routine balance testing critical to quality, safety and regulatory compliance. A free e-Learning course and certificate from METTLER TOLEDO introduces important weighing terms and helps you choose test weights, implement testing procedures, and interpret results.

Scientists and quality assurance professionals working in regulated industries such as pharmaceuticals know that analytical balances are the heart of virtually every quantitative analysis. Ensuring that balances used in lab processes weigh accurately is at the heart of good science and safe manufacturing.

However, even in industries that are not as tightly regulated, the answer to keeping processes running smoothly can be found in large part in periodic balance testing. This is because use of out-of-tolerance balances can affect raw-materials use, damage end-product quality, increase costs and risk unhappy customers.

METTLER TOLEDO offers an e-Learning course to help. Routine Balance Testing is designed to give interested professionals the information they need to understand periodic balance testing and implement it effectively. Easy-to-follow material outlines tests for sensitivity, repeatability, and eccentricity, which help ensure proper balance function. Upon successful course completion, a proficiency certificate will be issued.

The Routine Balance Testing e-Learning course—part of the lab-equipment leader’s year-long e-Calendar—will be available free throughout the month of July.

Keep watching for future e-Calendar installments that will continue to highlight lab-performance issues and offer ideas to optimize processes and improve accuracy.

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