Opinion

... in response to What is Gulf War Syndrome?
  1. david Hill david Hill United Kingdom says:

    Simon Wessely of Kings collage London has done a lot to help governments not to pay out compensation to veterans calling gulf war syndrome  rumor he has also worked on ground zero  and lung problems in firefighters caused by the collapse of the twin towers and calls it hysteria for his work he was awarded a knighthood by the British government .

    Rumors shaped veterans' view of Gulf War ills: syndrome was defined by informal communication.   thefreelibrary.com
    After the bullets stopped flying the rumors took off among British veterans of the 1991 Gulf War. Early accounts of physical and emotional reactions to wartime experiences spread from one person to another through networks of veterans. Within a few years, these former soldiers had decided among themselves that the symptoms they were suffering from collectively amounted to the controversial illness known as Gulf War Syndrome, a new study concludes. Simon Wessely of King's College London and his colleagues analyzed extensive written accounts provided in 1996 by 1,100 British Gulf War vets. The research team doesn't regard the rumors as necessarily untrue or misleading, Rumor proved to be critical among the British Gulf War vets because it counteracted a lack of communication from military and government authorities, Wessely says. Vets turned to their own social grapevine for answers, Wessely's group reports in a paper to appear in Social Science & Medicine.

    From
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    By Andrew Marshall Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2011
    Sufferers of World Trade Center syndrome, meanwhile, blamed proximity to Ground Zero for coughs and other respiratory problems long after airborne contaminants posed any health threat.
    All these are examples of mass hysteria, a bizarre yet surprisingly common phenomenon that is increasingly recognized as a significant health and social problem. For centuries it has crossed cultures and religions, taking on different forms to keep pace with popular obsessions and fears. In our post-9/11 world,
    Simon Wessely King's College London

    • Dawn Thomas Dawn Thomas United States says:

      I can say with all clarity of mind that the symptoms the veterans are experiencing are real. What is not clear is the methods used to study the veterans. An error has been made in trying to find a single common cause of the illnesses presented. Any one with a medical background should now understand that genetic makeup of the personnell is a definitive factor as to how a causitive agent may present as an illness. It is not apparent that this has been included in the studies.
      If we continue to try to use studies that do not clarify this factor it will obviously be flawed in the outcome or results. Any quality study is only as good as the data used hence the old expression "garbage in garbage out."

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