Higher levels of physical activity associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular events in adults with CKD

NewsGuard 100/100 Score

In this long-term study of 3,926 adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) recently published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), researchers found that individuals with higher levels of physical activity were less likely to experience an atherosclerotic event (e.g. heart attack, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease), new-onset heart failure, and death as compared to those with lower levels of physical activity.

In this long-term study of 3,926 adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD), researchers found that individuals with higher levels of physical activity were less likely to experience an atherosclerotic event (e.g. heart attack, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease), new-onset heart failure, and death as compared to those with lower levels of physical activity. In terms of effect size, the association between higher physical activity and lower risk for incident PAD was particularly striking.

In addtion, their finding of an inverse relationship between physical activity level and incident heart failure is noteworthy in view of the high prevalence and cost of heart failure in the CKD population.

Findings were similar for analyses evaluating adherence to guideline-recommended (>150 minutes/week) level of physical activity, and strengthen the evidence supporting current guideline recommendations. These findings reinforce the importance of incorporating counseling regarding physical activity into the routine clinical care of patients with CKD.

Source:
Journal reference:

Bruinius, J.W., et al. (2022) Self-reported Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Events in Adults With CKD: Findings From the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. American Journal of Kidney Diseases. doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2022.05.007.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
SGLT2 inhibitors: A game-changer in preventing heart failure and sudden cardiac deaths