Malaria

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
What is Malaria?

Malaria is an infectious disease of tropical countries. It is spread by mosquitoes. It is manifested by fever along with chills and rigors. Unless it is diagnosed and treated promptly, it can be fatal. A single mosquito bite may be enough to cause the infection.

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Latest Malaria News and Research

Fast-acting anti-malarial compound shows promise in first clinical trial

Fast-acting anti-malarial compound shows promise in first clinical trial

New research initiative to investigate multi-species response to novel coronavirus

New research initiative to investigate multi-species response to novel coronavirus

Critical guidance to identify COVID-19 patients at risk of drug-induced sudden cardiac death

Critical guidance to identify COVID-19 patients at risk of drug-induced sudden cardiac death

Why hoarding of hydroxychloroquine needs to stop

Why hoarding of hydroxychloroquine needs to stop

Huge WHO trial of COVID-19 therapies begins

Huge WHO trial of COVID-19 therapies begins

DFG underlines the need for long-term, knowledge-driven basic research

DFG underlines the need for long-term, knowledge-driven basic research

Researchers highlight urgent need for public health leadership during COVID-19 pandemic

Researchers highlight urgent need for public health leadership during COVID-19 pandemic

Triple therapies effective and safe in malaria

Triple therapies effective and safe in malaria

Demand for coffee has a direct link to malaria risk

Demand for coffee has a direct link to malaria risk

Individual responsibility to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is equally vital as government action

Individual responsibility to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is equally vital as government action

Novel compounds show promise as potent new treatment for malaria

Novel compounds show promise as potent new treatment for malaria

How malaria evades the body’s immune response

How malaria evades the body’s immune response

Drugs targeting T cells may be effective in treating cerebral malaria

Drugs targeting T cells may be effective in treating cerebral malaria

Simple blood test measures the body's immune response to improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

Simple blood test measures the body's immune response to improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

Swansea University drug resistance research highlighted in two prestigious journals

Swansea University drug resistance research highlighted in two prestigious journals

Researchers develop high-resolution forecast model for the spread of malaria

Researchers develop high-resolution forecast model for the spread of malaria

To fight Chinese outbreak, doctors deploy drugs targeting HIV, malaria and Ebola

To fight Chinese outbreak, doctors deploy drugs targeting HIV, malaria and Ebola

Major breakthrough in understanding how malaria parasite grows and multiplies

Major breakthrough in understanding how malaria parasite grows and multiplies

Study identifies potential drug target and way to alleviate cerebral malaria

Study identifies potential drug target and way to alleviate cerebral malaria

Researchers reveal new activity above the surface in brain-cell receptors

Researchers reveal new activity above the surface in brain-cell receptors