Malaria

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
What is Malaria?

Malaria is an infectious disease of tropical countries. It is spread by mosquitoes. It is manifested by fever along with chills and rigors. Unless it is diagnosed and treated promptly, it can be fatal. A single mosquito bite may be enough to cause the infection.

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Latest Malaria News and Research

World's largest resource of genome variation data on malaria parasites released

World's largest resource of genome variation data on malaria parasites released

Covid strikes clergy as they comfort pandemic’s sick and dying

Covid strikes clergy as they comfort pandemic’s sick and dying

Countries with older populations have higher SARS-CoV-2 infections and deaths, says study

Countries with older populations have higher SARS-CoV-2 infections and deaths, says study

Eating low-quality diet during pregnancy is linked to late-childhood obesity

Eating low-quality diet during pregnancy is linked to late-childhood obesity

Interval between doses of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine can be safely extended to 3 months, suggests study

Interval between doses of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine can be safely extended to 3 months, suggests study

Antimicrobial resistance to critical drugs spirals in low- and middle-income countries

Antimicrobial resistance to critical drugs spirals in low- and middle-income countries

New test can help eliminate mosquito-borne disease

New test can help eliminate mosquito-borne disease

Cone snail venom could potentially treat severe forms of malaria

Cone snail venom could potentially treat severe forms of malaria

Development of malaria vaccines deserves urgent attention just like COVID-19

Development of malaria vaccines deserves urgent attention just like COVID-19

What are the changes in the physical phenotype of blood cells in COVID-19?

What are the changes in the physical phenotype of blood cells in COVID-19?

Scent detection dogs can be used to screen and identify COVID-19-infected individuals

Scent detection dogs can be used to screen and identify COVID-19-infected individuals

Duration of delirium in critically ill patients predicts mortality and disability

Duration of delirium in critically ill patients predicts mortality and disability

COVID-19 pandemic and nanotechnology

COVID-19 pandemic and nanotechnology

Research shows intestinal parasite infestations reduce COVID-19 severity

Research shows intestinal parasite infestations reduce COVID-19 severity

Phase 1 clinical trial of novel HIV vaccine approach shows promising results

Phase 1 clinical trial of novel HIV vaccine approach shows promising results

Study could help understand mechanisms of drug molecules to mitigate COVID-19 infection

Study could help understand mechanisms of drug molecules to mitigate COVID-19 infection

Scientists engineer potent trivalent inhibitors of thrombin

Scientists engineer potent trivalent inhibitors of thrombin

Researchers uncover traces of malarial adaptation in African people

Researchers uncover traces of malarial adaptation in African people

R&D lacking on emerging infectious diseases, report finds

R&D lacking on emerging infectious diseases, report finds

Certain malaria parasites use a mechanism to cross the blood–brain barrier

Certain malaria parasites use a mechanism to cross the blood–brain barrier