Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence (UI), or the unintentional loss of urine, is a problem for more than 13 million Americans—85 percent of them women. Although about half of the elderly have episodes of incontinence, bladder problems are not a natural consequence of aging, and they are not exclusively a problem of the elderly.

Incontinence has several causes. Women are most likely to develop incontinence either during pregnancy and childbirth, or after the hormonal changes of menopause, because of weakened pelvic muscles. Older men can become incontinent as the result of prostate surgery. Pelvic trauma, spinal cord damage, caffeine, or medications including cold or over-the-counter diet tablets also can cause episodes of incontinence.

But even though urinary incontinence can be improved in 8 out of 10 cases, fewer than half of those with bladder problems ever discuss the condition with their health care professional. The condition often goes untreated.

Overview

Feature Articles

Latest Urinary Incontinence News and Research

How does SARS-CoV-2 infection impact female fertility?

How does SARS-CoV-2 infection impact female fertility?

Postmenopausal women more likely to have overactive bladder syndrome, study says

Postmenopausal women more likely to have overactive bladder syndrome, study says

Urinary incontinence could contribute to increased risk of falls in older adults

Urinary incontinence could contribute to increased risk of falls in older adults

Study shows higher health care costs and worse outcomes for incontinent patients

Study shows higher health care costs and worse outcomes for incontinent patients

Patient decision aids for urologic conditions fall short of quality and readability standards

Patient decision aids for urologic conditions fall short of quality and readability standards

Study finds substantial decline in physical, cognitive, or psychological health among older people

Study finds substantial decline in physical, cognitive, or psychological health among older people

Online, video-based exercise program can help postpartum women with diastasis rectus abdominis

Online, video-based exercise program can help postpartum women with diastasis rectus abdominis

Knowledge and support from primary care services can improve women's health during menopause

Knowledge and support from primary care services can improve women's health during menopause

MRI screening and targeted biopsies could reduce overdiagnoses of prostate cancer

MRI screening and targeted biopsies could reduce overdiagnoses of prostate cancer

Multiple geriatric conditions increase treatment burden in older patients with bladder cancer

Multiple geriatric conditions increase treatment burden in older patients with bladder cancer

Researchers successfully implanted the first artificial tubular muscle in vivo

Researchers successfully implanted the first artificial tubular muscle in vivo

Medications commonly prescribed for schizophrenia linked to cognitive impairment

Medications commonly prescribed for schizophrenia linked to cognitive impairment

Stress incontinence surgery does not increased risk of pelvic cancers

Stress incontinence surgery does not increased risk of pelvic cancers

App-based treatment for urinary incontinence was as effective as in-person treatment

App-based treatment for urinary incontinence was as effective as in-person treatment

Physical comorbidity is associated with high psychological distress

Physical comorbidity is associated with high psychological distress

Medical mistrust can make African Americans to regret their choice of treatment for prostate cancer

Medical mistrust can make African Americans to regret their choice of treatment for prostate cancer

Implantable smart wrap may help people who have under-active bladders

Implantable smart wrap may help people who have under-active bladders

Fewer older adults may be experiencing restricting symptoms at the end of life

Fewer older adults may be experiencing restricting symptoms at the end of life

Study shows active surveillance to be safe for African American men with low-risk prostate cancer

Study shows active surveillance to be safe for African American men with low-risk prostate cancer

UH researcher receives $1.6 million to reverse urinary incontinence

UH researcher receives $1.6 million to reverse urinary incontinence