20,000 deaths each day from cancer

According to the results of a new report by the American Cancer Society, worldwide in 2007 there were more than 12 million new cancer cases diagnosed.

The report, "Global Cancer Facts and Figures" found that approximately 7.6 million people died from cancer this year, which equates to 20,000 deaths each day.

For men from developed nations the most frequent forms of the disease diagnosed were prostate, lung and colon cancers; while for women in developed countries, breast colon and lung cancers were the most frequently diagnosed.

In the developing world, men were most likely to be diagnosed with lung, stomach and liver cancers, while women were most likely to be diagnosed with breast, uterine and stomach cancers.

Dr. Ahmedin Jemal, a co-author of the report and the director of the society's Cancer Occurrence Office, says the report aims to promote cancer control and increase awareness worldwide.

Dr. Jemal says as smoking prevalence is decreasing in developed countries and as tobacco companies are losing that market they are trying to expand their market in developing countries.

The report shows a gap in cancer survival among economically developed nations and economically developing countries due in part to infection and the poor access to medical care in the developing world.

Infection-related cancers such as cervical cancer and stomach cancer, are three times more common in developing nations.

The report says lifestyle is also a factor and cancer screening and medical care other factors.

The American Cancer Society predicts that in 2050, there will be 27 million new cancer cases and 17.5 million cancer deaths "simply due to the growth and aging of the population" around the world.

The American Cancer Society based its predictions on data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

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