Caloricious launches new application for mobile devices to help customers find nutrition-specific products

Caloricious announced today the launch of the first custom search engine for mobile devices that enables customers to find nutrition-specific products in their local supermarkets.  It is the only available fully-loaded power application that focuses strictly on the preferences and allergens contained in food and beverage items.  "We are thrilled to launch our company in this booming online food media sector," says founder and CEO, Guna Ramireddy.  "We fully expect that Caloricious will revolutionize the way consumers view shopping for their personal dietary needs."

Caloricious was officially established in August of 2009.  The new Caloricious application is compatible with any iPhone or iPod Touch device with operating system version 2.0, and offers the following features:

  • A quick, easy search of over 30,000 food and beverage items;
  • Consumer ability to identify products based on nutrients, allergens, ingredients and preference, such as organic, natural, vegetarian and vegan;
  • Simple explanations of health benefits for each product;
  • Calorie labeling and marking questionable additives;
  • Traffic light labeling alerts indicating high fat, cholesterol, sugar and sodium;
  • Spelling correction and search tips, including descriptive keywords, such as "high protein bars" or "gluten free cereal".

Already featured on the front page of the "New and Noteworthy" section on the iTunes app store, and priced at $2.99, Caloricious will continue to add products, recipes and additional nutritious information as the application gains momentum among consumers.  "It's well-designed, well-implemented and a strong foundation for things to come," says Ramireddy.  "With such a wide range of dietary habits and needs and so little time to do the research, Caloricious is going to make many lives that much easier."

Source:

Caloricious

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