NYU Langone Health earns Leapfrog's top safety ratings for the seventh time in a row

For the seventh time in a row, NYU Langone Health has earned top safety ratings for its inpatient locations across the system, with each receiving "A" ratings in the fall 2023 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade release, a level of patient safety achieved by only 30 percent of hospitals nationwide.

NYU Langone inpatient locations that received top marks are Tisch Hospital and Kimmel Pavilion in Manhattan, NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn, and NYU Langone Hospital—Long Island.

These consistent 'A' ratings from Leapfrog are another independent validation of the safe, quality care we offer to patients across our systemExceptional safety outcomes are the baseline at NYU Langone, so patients can be confident they will receive unparalleled care from dedicated health professionals who are always working to raise the bar."

Robert I. Grossman, MD, CEO of NYU Langone and Dean of NYU Grossman School of Medicine

The Leapfrog Group, an independent national watchdog organization, assigns a letter grade, from "A" to "F," to general hospitals across the country based on more than 30 performance measures reflecting errors, accidents, injuries, and infections, as well as the systems that hospitals have in place to prevent harm. Leapfrog releases updated grades twice annually in the fall and spring.

Earlier this year, Vizient Inc. named NYU Langone the No. 1 hospital in the nation for quality and patient safety. Additionally, U.S. News & World Report included NYU Langone on its "Best Hospitals Honor Roll," ranking 10 of its clinical specialties among the top 10 in the nation, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) awarded NYU Langone five stars for safety, quality, and patient experience.

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