Heart Foundation applauds new vaping reforms to curb e-cigarette use in Australia

The Heart Foundation has welcomed the Australian Government’s commitment to new vaping reforms designed to curb e-cigarette use in Australia.

From January 1, 2024, the Government will implement a ban on the importation of disposable single use vapes, while improving access to therapeutic, medically prescribed vapes, for people trying to quit smoking.

From March 1, 2024, further changes are expected to commence, including the:

  • A cessation of the personal importation of vapes.
  • A ban on the importation of non-therapeutic vapes.
  • A requirement for therapeutic vape importers and manufacturers to notify the Therapeutic Goods Administration of their product’s compliance with the relevant product standards.
  • Requirement for importers to obtain a licence and permit from the Australian Government’s Office of Drug Control before the products are imported.

We welcome any Government intervention when it comes to curbing vaping use, especially among the young. Vaping, or the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), has gained popularity in recent years as an alternative to traditional tobacco smoking.

The use of e-cigarettes containing nicotine can lead to an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, which may pose longer term risks to users’ cardiovascular health and increase the risk of future heart events.

Meanwhile, young Australians who vape are roughly three times more inclined to start tobacco smoking, when compared to other young people who have never vaped.

Smoking has significant adverse effects on heart health, and it is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Secondhand smoke exposure is also harmful to heart health. Non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke have an increased risk of developing heart disease.”

David Lloyd, Chief Executive Officer, Heart Foundation 

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