Sequella receives Phase 1 SBIR grant for developing SQ641

Sequella, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on commercializing novel antibiotics to treat life-threatening infectious diseases, today announced that it received a $594,661 two-year Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) for the development of SQ641, Sequella's lead compound in its capuramycin series, a new class of antibiotic.

The Phase 1 SBIR grant will support studies with SQ641 to investigate activity against several different Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium abscessus strains in white blood cells in vitro and in animal models. These studies will measure SQ641 activity against clinically important NTM pathogens in anticipation of potential advancement to Investigational New Drug (IND)-directed preclinical studies.

"There are few effective drugs currently available to treat NTM-related infections," said Dr. Carol Nacy, CEO of Sequella, "and these infections are increasing dramatically in the U.S., nearly 5% per year from 1998 to 2007. New infections were reported not only in immunocompromised individuals, as has been seen in the past, but also in a significant and rising number of patients with intact immune systems. New and more potent drugs will be required to treat these bacteria, ubiquitous in water and soil, as they are now posing a threat to everyone."

Source:

Sequella, Inc.

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