NYBC calls for blood donation in recognition of National Blood Donor Month

Give Blood Today, Boost Community Supply and Help Save Lives!

New York Blood Center (NYBC) and its divisions in Manhattan, Long Island, Hudson Valley, Brooklyn/Staten Island, and New Jersey call upon the community to please donate blood, in recognition of National Blood Donor Month, and to help save lives.

Approximately every two seconds, someone needs blood. Four million Americans would die each year without it, and the only place to get this precious resource is from volunteer blood donors. Every day in the U.S., approximately 39,000 units of blood are needed in hospitals and emergency treatment facilities for patients with cancer and other diseases, for organ transplant recipients, and to help save the lives of accident victims.

Fewer than 5 percent of healthy Americans eligible to donate blood actually donate each year. In New York, only 2% actually donate. Several donors aiming to change those statistics include:

Alan Singer of Edison, NJ, has given blood regularly for 28 years, and recently introduced his daughter, Zahava, to the selfless act of giving blood by accompanying her to her very first blood donation. Alan often gives blood in Manhattan, near his place of work.

Elliot Vanacour of Marlboro, NJ, a New York City transit employee and blood donor of 28 years, recently celebrated his 200th career blood donation at New York Blood Services' One New York Plaza Donor Center.

Albert Fischer of Massapequa, NY, recently donated his 320th pint of whole blood, a total of 40 gallons. Albert often gives blood with the Golden Donors, a group of dedicated volunteer retirees.

Blood is traditionally in short supply during the winter months due to the holidays, travel schedules, inclement weather and illness. January, in particular, can be a difficult month for blood centers to collect blood donations, as approximately 15% of regional blood collection comes from high schools and colleges, many of which have winter recess this month.

Once donated, blood can be separated into several components including red blood cells, platelets and plasma. A single blood donation can help save the lives of up to three people.

People can donate a pint of blood every 56 days. An adult of average weight has about 10 to 12 units of blood, so one pint is easy to spare. You may get it back someday, as one out of three people will need a life-saving blood transfusion in his or her lifetime.

NYBC thanks every individual blood donor and the wide variety of organizations that sponsor blood drives throughout the winter season.

To donate blood, please call:

Toll Free: 1-800-933-2566

Visit: www.nybloodcenter.org

Any company, community organization, place of worship, or individual may host a blood drive. NYBC also offers special community service scholarships for students who organize community blood drives during the winter holiday and summer periods. Blood donors receive free mini-medical exams on site including information about their temperature, pulse rate, blood pressure and hemoglobin level. Eligible donors include those people at least age 16 (with parental permission or consent), who weigh a minimum of 110 pounds, are in good health and meet all Food & Drug Administration and NY or NJ State Department of Health donor criteria. People age 76 and over may donate with a doctor's note.

SOURCE New York Blood Center

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