KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, BioSilta Oy collaborate to optimise protein screening

KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm and Biotechnology start-up BioSilta Oy of Oulu Finland have been collaborating over the last year to optimise protein screening in a range of microwell plate formats. The technique utilises EnBase Flo the newly developed Enzymatic Release media technology from BioSilta. EnBase® shall be implemented in the process to accelerate secondary screening of previously poor expressing candidates within the Human Protein atlas project.

“BioSilta are proud to be part of this prestigious scientific project and the selection of EnBase® is the culmination of the dedicated work for both sets of scientists in bringing about an innovative screening solution in microwell format whilst maintaining the very high selectivity standards set by KTH”

This agreement coincides with the appointment of YouDoBio headed by Dr Peter Roberts to distribute BioSilta products within Sweden & Denmark.

"BioSilta are proud to be part of this prestigious scientific project and the selection of EnBase® is the culmination of the dedicated work for both sets of scientists in bringing about an innovative screening solution in microwell format whilst maintaining the very high selectivity standards set by KTH", states Russell Golson CEO of BioSilta Oy.

EnBase-Flo has a growing number of users who benefit from significantly enhanced microbial protein production and selectivity in its use. This product is one of an exciting product portfolio that will see further developments in 2010 for the benefit of the Microbial cell culture community who desire enhanced recombinant protein production.

"The collaboration with BioSilta has been very fruitful for us in the Swedish Human Protein Atlas project. By combining our knowledge we have been able to develop a very reliable screening method used to determine if a protein could be successfully expressed or not. We see a great potential in the EnBase® technology and hope other research groups also will find this product beneficial", states Prof. Sophia Hober, Director of Protein Science, HPR.

The Swedish Human Proteome Resource (HPR) program, is funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics.

Source:

BioSilta Oy

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