Sleep DownUnder 2019 hosts leading experts to reveal latest snooze secrets

Kiwifruit, cannabis, tongue implants and smartphone apps are among the latest sleep aids in the spotlight at an international sleep conference to be held in Sydney this week.

Sleep DownUnder 2019, running from October 17-19, will host more than 800 of Australasia’s sleep experts to reveal the latest research into sleep problems like insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), jet lag and snoring.

Among the discoveries are a raft of surprising new ideas and treatments to help Australians sleep better, as well as several studies showing just how fatigued and sleep deprived many people are.

“Sleep is a vital ingredient, along with a healthy diet and regular exercise, that humans need for good health,” says Professor Peter Eastwood, president of the Australasian Sleep Association, which hosts the conference. “But research is showing that as many as one in four Australians are not getting enough good quality sleep thanks to late night texting, insomnia or poor sleep habits.”

The three-day congress canvasses topics as diverse as drowsy driving risks, cabin crew fatigue, an alarm for back-sleepers with OSA, and research showing why insomnia treatment works better in summer. Other new research will be presented on the effect of poor sleep on children’s waistlines and academic performance. Several new tech gadgets to treat OSA and insomnia are also on the agenda.

This is a very exciting time in the world of sleep research. Many of the new devices being developed and new findings being presented around fatigue and insomnia have the power to make a real difference in the lives of tired Australians.”

Professor Peter Eastwood, president, Australasian Sleep Association

The 31th annual scientific conference will open on Thursday, October 17 at the International Convention Centre, Sydney. More than 800 delegates will attend across three days, with 200 abstracts to be presented on all aspects of sleep health and sleep disorders.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post
You might also like... ×
Disturbed breathing during sleep may increase stroke risk in people with spinal cord injury