New statement addresses current controversies and evolving concepts in thyroid cancer care

The American Thyroid Association, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, the European Thyroid Association, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging released a joint statement on three key topics addressing controversies in thyroid cancer care. The joint statement is published in the peer-reviewed journal Thyroid®, the official journal of the American Thyroid Association® (ATA®).

An inter-societal working group addressed the current controversies and evolving concepts in three main areas: peri-operative risk stratification; the role of diagnostic radioactive iodine (RAI) imaging in initial staging; and indicators of response to RAI therapy. They reached several conclusions that are detailed in the joint statement, led by Seza Gulec, MD, Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, and coauthors. For peri-operative risk stratification, the working group concluded that this should include "judicious incorporation of molecular theranostics to further refine management recommendations."

The article provides a useful update on thyroid cancer management issues through a truly collaborative effort from leading societies across the globe."

Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS, Editor-in-Chief of Thyroid, Professor of Surgery, Chief, Division of General Surgery, Harry A. Oberhelman and Mark L. Welton Professor, Stanford University School of Medicine (Stanford, CA)

Source:
Journal reference:

Gulec, S.A., et al. (2021) A Joint Statement from the American Thyroid Association, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, the European Thyroid Association, the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging on Current Diagnostic and Theranostic Approaches in the Management of Thyroid Cancer. Thyroid. doi.org/10.1089/thy.2020.0826.

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