BBRF hosts a free webinar on manipulating memories to help treat brain illness

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The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (BBRF) is hosting a free webinar, "Manipulating Memories to Help Treat Brain Illness" on Tuesday, August 9, 2022, at 2:00 pm EDT. The presenter will be Steve Ramirez, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University and a recipient of a 2016 Young Investigator Grant. Register today at BBRFoundation.org

Dr. Ramirez will talk about the emerging field of artificial memory manipulation and will focus on manipulating positive and negative memories to better understand how these processes work. Can memories be manipulated to prevent brain pathologies or to restore cognition and behavior? Dr. Ramirez will discuss how memory manipulation might be leveraged to treat brain disorders in general, and highlight their potential to increase the overall health of an organism. Jeffrey Borenstein, M.D., President and CEO of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation and Host and Executive Producer of the public television series "Healthy Minds," will be the moderator.

This webinar is part of a series of free monthly "Meet the Scientist" webinars on the latest developments in psychiatry offered by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation.

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