Portable bladder volume ultrasound now included in 2009 CDC guidelines for the prevention CA-UTIs

Verathon®, maker of BladderScan® bladder volume instruments is pleased to announce that portable bladder volume ultrasound is now included in the new 2009 CDC guidelines for the Prevention of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CA-UTIs). The new CDC guidelines, introduced in early November 2009, replace the previous guidelines which date back to 1981. The guidelines are located on the Web at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/dpac_uti_pc.html

The issuance of the new CDC Guidelines in November follow the news from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) posted in October 1, 2008, that announced Medicare would no longer reimburse for treatment of preventable nosocomial CA-UTIs. That important regulatory change has meant that hospitals now may face significant cost increases based on reduced reimbursements for CA-UTIs contracted during a hospital stay.

"Over the past several years, many acute care and long term care facilities have found BladderScan® bladder volume ultrasound helpful in reducing the number of catheterizations and related urinary tract infections," stated Gerald McMorrow, CEO and Founder of Verathon Inc. "With bladder ultrasound now included in the new guidelines, many other health care providers will be able to include this valuable tool in their catheter bundles," continued McMorrow.

BladderScan® 3D ultrasound bladder volume instruments provide quick, accurate and reliable bladder volume measurements. The measurements are noninvasive, and the devices are portable and easy for staff to use.

The new CDC guidelines include the following information for portable ultrasound:

  1. Consider using a portable ultrasound device to assess urine volume in patients undergoing intermittent catheterization to assess urine volume and reduce necessary catheter insertions. (II-H)
  2. If ultrasound bladder scanners are used, ensure that indications for use are clearly stated, nursing staff are trained in their use, and equipment is adequately cleaned and disinfected in between patients. (II-H-1)
  3. Implement quality improvement (QI) programs or strategies to enhance appropriate use of indwelling catheters and to reduce the risk of CAUTI based on a facility risk assessment. (IV-A)

The purposes of the QI programs should be: 1) to assure appropriate utilization of catheters 2) to identify and remove catheters that are no longer needed (e.g. daily review of their continued need) and 3) to ensure adherence to hand hygiene and proper care of catheters. (IV-A)

Examples of programs that have been demonstrated to be effective include:

Protocols for management of postoperative urinary retention, such as nurse-directed use of intermittent catheterization and use of bladder ultrasound scanners. (IV-A-b)

Infection control and prevention is an increasing concern in healthcare settings -- and UTIs are the most common hospital-acquired infection. According to a study in the American Journal of Medicine, the annual cost of UTIs in hospitals may be as much as $451 million.

In 2002, the CDC estimated that UTIs accounted for 36% of all nosocomial infections. That year, more than 13,000 deaths were attributed to hospital-acquired UTIs. Up to 25% of hospitalized patients have a urinary catheter placed during their stay. The use of indwelling urinary catheters accounts for 80% of nosocomial UTIs.

The new CDC guidelines indicate that, "an estimated 17% to 69% of CAUTI may be preventable with recommended infection control measures, which means that up to 380,000 infections and 9000 deaths related to CAUTI per year could be prevented."

SOURCE Verathon Inc.

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