Encision’s AEM system recognized as technology to eliminate visceral burns

Encision Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: ECIA), a medical device company owning patented surgical technology that is emerging as a standard of care in minimally-invasive surgery, recognized as a technology to eliminate visceral burns during monopolar electrical surgery.

In a paper presented at the 3rd International Laparoscopic Complication meeting, May 14, 2010 by George Vilos, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada titled Why Bad Things Happen to Good People During Laparoscopy Surgery, Dr. Vilos said, "During monopolar electrosurgery, visceral burns may occur by inadvertent direct coupling, capacitive coupling or insulation failure of instruments. These dangers may become particularly important with the use of monopolar electrosurgery. . ." Dr. Vilos continued, "The inherent risks of monopolar electrosurgery may be eliminated by. . .the application of technologies that safely divert/eliminate stray energy such as the active electrode monitoring (AEM®) system."

The invitation from Meeting President, George A. Pistofidis, MB.BS, FRCOG states, "Unfortunately, complications represent the unmentionable side of surgery, the area that no one wants to admit to. As surgeons we are all exposed to the unpredictable and even the most experienced surgeons have faced complications at some stage of their surgical career. Over three days 55 advanced laparoscopic surgeons from all over the globe will gather to share their personal experiences and discuss key issues that center on the role of the human factor in complications."

"We are pleased that Dr. Vilos recognized in his presentation our AEM® (Active Electrode Monitoring) technology as a means to avoid visceral burns in patients," said Jack Serino, President and CEO of Encision Inc.

Source:

Encision Inc.

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