CVS Caremark adds Access' MuGard to pharmacy benefit network

Access Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (OTCBB: ACCP), a biopharmaceutical company leveraging its proprietary drug-delivery platforms to develop treatments in areas of oncology, cancer supportive care and diabetes, announced that its lead product for oral mucositis, MuGard, has been added to CVS Caremark's pharmacy benefit network.  Reimbursement coverage for MuGard is now available with standard pharmacy benefit copayment.  Placement in the pharmacy benefit plan will assist in driving increased reimbursement coverage of MuGard.

CVS Caremark is the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States.  As one of the country's largest pharmacy benefits managers (PBMs), CVS Caremark covers 50 million lives and 2,000 different insurance benefits plans.  Several Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) utilize CVS Caremark's PBM's services, including Amerigroup, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island, Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee, Federal Employee Program (FEP), Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey and Tufts Health Plan.  

"We are pleased with the recent addition to CVS Caremark's network as it will offer cancer patients increased access to MuGard allowing them the ability to take control of their anticancer regimen from day one and significantly reduce the onset and severity of oral mucositis," said Anthony Mottola, Vice President, Managed Care and Market Access, Access Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  He continued, "We look forward to a long relationship with CVS Caremark and are committed to working with other pharmacy benefit managers, as well as adding more payers and programs to continue making MuGard more readily available to cancer patients."

Source:

Access Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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