Cellectricon, UCL to host webinar to explore use of primary cells for biomedical research

Cellectricon and UCL unite to present a webinar, March 27, 11am-12pm EDT

Cellectricon, a leading provider of advanced cell-based screening technologies and services, will co-host a webinar with top researchers at University College London (UCL). The webinar will explore the use of primary cells as a biologically-relevant model for biomedical research, and highlight the new high-throughput techniques and phenotypic screening approaches that are used by UCL to investigate cellular processes in such cells. The paradigm shift which proposes the use of primary cell types, rather than traditional transformed cell lines, provides a more physiologically accurate view and could help reduce the current high attrition rate in drug discovery programmes. Offering participants a rare opportunity to hear first-hand from leading researchers, the webinar, entitled ‘Novel approaches for the study of cellular processes in biologically-relevant model systems’, will take place on March 27, 11am-12pm EDT. To register, please visit https://cellectricon.com/

Participants will hear from Dr Robin Ketteler, Group Leader, and Dr Catia Andreassi, Senior Scientist, at the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, UCL, who will provide listeners with an expert insight into the mechanisms of axonal mRNA transport, a vital process for the maintenance of precise neuronal networks in the brain. The session will go on to reveal how Dr Ketteler’s team are using combinatorial approaches to investigate cellular regulation mechanisms in primary neurons, and how these methods have enabled the group to identify a novel regulatory element that directs mRNA localisation and translation. Attendees of this webinar will gain an educational and eye-opening overview of new techniques that can be used successfully to drive biomedical research in biologically-relevant models.

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