Cell Science Systems launches new blood test profile for GI disorders

Distinguishing the cause of gut disorders can be complicated. Therefore, Cell Science Systems, Corp. today announced the launch of a new test to help clinicians reach a diagnosis; and, suggest dietary strategies to improve whatever gut malady a person may have. The Gut Health Profile or, GHP, is a blood test profile that evaluates GI health and risks on a genetic, antibody and cellular level.  The GHP may be of use to physicians in determining risk of celiac and other GI conditions as well as identifying disease triggering foods other than gluten.

Understanding celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

Celiac disease affects about 1% of the population. However, some experts believe the disease is underdiagnosed.  Moreover, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which may present symptoms similar to celiac disease are believed to be a much larger problem.

Dr. Alessio Fasano, a celiac researcher from Harvard, has identified a link between gluten intolerance and various non celiac gastrointestinal problems; including diarrhea, bloating, and indigestion; which could, under the right circumstance and with the right co-factors, progress to full blown celiac.  Dr Fasano States, "Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are subsets of gluten intolerance. Anyone who has celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is, by definition, gluten intolerant."  Dr. Fasano concludes that sensitivity to gluten exists on a spectrum, from some people who are terribly sensitive as with celiac disease, to others who have no sensitivity at all — a spectrum that includes many, many people at every point in between.  The Gut Health Panel is designed to help clarify where someone is on the spectrum

Source:

Cell Science Systems

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