Use of antiseptic mouthwash could put patients at risk for CVD

Nathan Bryan, Ph.D., one of the world's leading experts on the critically important role of Nitric Oxide (NO) in the health of many of the body's organs and systems, said," understanding the vital effects of bacteria in the mouth is essential for health care providers, although it is not widely understood by the public." He delivered an invited lecture to attendees of the The American Naturopathic Medical Association 36th Annual Convention and Educational Seminar.

Bryan explained, "Recent discoveries reveal that oral bacteria provide the human body with continuous sources of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is one of the most important molecules produced in the human body. It controls and regulates blood pressure and is a major factor in preventing cardiovascular disease. Loss of nitric oxide is the earliest event in the onset and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading killer of men and women worldwide.

"Poor oral hygiene, the use of antiseptic mouthwash or antibiotics can kill these commensal bacteria and disrupt nitric oxide production putting patients at risk for CVD.

For example, there is strong data that demonstrates that antiseptic mouthwashes may eliminate "bad breath," but, at the same time, they raise a significant risk of killing "good", i.e. beneficial, oral bacteria that in turn, raises blood pressure. The rise, as much as 26 mm Hg, causes essential hypertension in healthy individuals."

Bryan concluded," Evidence based therapeutic and nutritional strategies will be presented to health care and wellness professionals how to restore nitric oxide production to overcome the body's own inefficiencies." Most if not all people over the age of 40 do not produce enough nitric oxide to significantly reduce inflammation and disease.

Comments

  1. Mano Manoharan Mano Manoharan United Kingdom says:

    "For example, there is strong data that demonstrates that antiseptic mouthwashes may eliminate "bad breath," but, at the same time, they raise a significant risk of killing "good", i.e. beneficial, oral bacteria that in turn, raises blood pressure. The rise, as much as 26 mm Hg, causes essential hypertension in healthy individuals."
    Can I ask if tongue scraping is considered a 'safer' strategy for dealing with bad breath?

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post
You might also like... ×
'Google Maps' for cancer: Image-based model accurately represents blood traffic inside tumors