The presence of cancer-causing contaminant in popular foods

Acrylamide is described as 'extremely hazardous' and 'probably carcinogenic to humans'. Its presence in popular foods, including fried, baked, roasted and toasted potato and cereal products, as well as coffee, has become one of the most difficult issues facing the food industry, its supply chain, retailers and regulators. Written by internationally-renowned experts in the field, this book covers the issue from crop genetics to agronomy, biotechnology, food processing and regulation.

Processing contaminants, defined as undesirable chemicals that are not present in raw food but are produced during cooking or processing, are becoming an increasingly difficult problem for the food industry. Foremost of these is acrylamide, a carcinogenic and neurotoxic chemical that was only discovered in food in 2002. Food manufacturers must comply with ever-tightening regulations on the presence of acrylamide in their products while retaining the colors, flavours and aromas that define their brands and are demanded by consumers. Measures to reduce acrylamide formation involve crop genetics, agronomy, biotechnology and food processing, and are described in detail in the book.

This book, written by leading experts, tells you all you need to know about acrylamide in food, in a detailed but accessible manner. Acrylamide in Food highlights the emerging topic of processing contaminants, the complexity of food composition and how it is affected by high-temperature cooking and processing, and the multi-disciplinary nature of approaches being taken to address the problem. It also shows in stark detail how compliance with regulations is an important aspect of food industry sustainability, something that all stakeholders in the food supply chain need to take on board.

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