Tips to re-evaluate sleeping habits and establish healthy routines

With school back in session, children are resetting their routines. One that should not be overlooked? A consistent bedtime that leads to enough healthy sleep for children to thrive.

No matter the age, children report improved alertness, energy, mood and physical well-being when enjoying healthy, consistent sleep. Back-to-school time provides families with a perfect opportunity to re-evaluate their sleeping habits and establish healthy routines to ensure sufficient sleep."

Dr. Ilene Rosen, past president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

The AASM recommends children in these age groups get the following amount of sleep on a regular basis:

  • Infants 4 to 12 months old: 12 to 16 hours (including naps)
  • Children 1 to 2 years old: 11 to 14 hours (including naps)
  • Children 3 to 5 years old: 10 to 13 hours (including naps)
  • Children 6 to 12 years old: Nine to 12 hours
  • Teens 13 to 18 years old: Eight to 10 hours

With different sleep needs for each child, making sure that everyone goes to sleep on time and gets the sleep they need can be a challenge. To help, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has created an online bedtime calculator to determine a customized bedtime based on each individual's age and needed wake time.

Making time for sleep is especially important for high schoolers, as sleepy teens may fare worse in school than their well-rested peers. Studies have shown that teens who are sleep deprived may be more easily distracted and recall information more slowly. Sleeping fewer than the recommended hours also is associated with attention, behavior and learning problems. This is why it is vital to prep the entire family for a successful year with healthy sleep habits.

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