Diagnostic imaging gets cardiovascular eye

Imaging has become a heated topic, embroiling cardiologists and more than 20 other medical specialists in a debate about tests selected and who performs and interprets them. In San Francisco on August 11-13, the American College of Cardiology is tackling this tough topic in its first-annual Integrated Cardiovascular Imaging Conference.

"Cardiovascular imaging is good medicine, and patients are well served when it is performed and interpreted by their cardiologist," said James Thomas, M.D., F.A.C.C., program director of the San Francisco conference. “By discussing all four imaging modalities at one conference, our attendees will see first-hand the value of having highly trained cardiologists ordering and reading these images for their patients."

Integrated Cardiovascular Imaging Conference, a live program at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, features 14 renowned imaging experts examining CT, MR, nuclear and echo. Individual sessions are devoted to each modality, followed by an exploration of imaging for various patient populations and cardiovascular conditions.

The faculty includes experts from such institutions as Cedars Sinai, the Cleveland Clinic, Duke, Harvard, St. Joseph’s, University of California Los Angeles and University of Virginia. Many instructors will be on site and available to attendees for the duration of this seminal program.

A dynamic lunchtime panel on Aug. 11, led by Manuel D. Cerqueira, M.D., F.A.C.C., will offer input from payers, ACC advocacy staff and other experts on the current regulatory climate. For the most up-to-date information on cardiovascular imaging and the ACC’s imaging initiatives, go to www.acc.org and click on “View on Imaging."

The American College of Cardiology, a 33,000-member nonprofit professional medical society and teaching institution, is dedicated to fostering optimal cardiovascular care and disease prevention through professional education, promotion of research, leadership in the development of standards and guidelines, and the formulation of health care policy.

http://www.acc.org/

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